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Full text of "Chimes, 1946"


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THE CHIMES 

1946 



PUBLISHED BY THE SENIOR CLASS 
BEREA COLLEGE, BEREA, KENTUCKY 



Joyce Hardin & Nancy King 
Co-Editors 



Tharon Musser 

Business Manager 



WE ARE BEREA, 1946. WE ARE THE STUDENTS WHO 
HUNG A SERVICE FLAG IN PHELPS STOKES AS A 
REMINDER THAT THE 1946 CENSUS WAS STILL IN- 
COMPLETE. NOW WE SEE OUR CLASSMATES RE- 
TURNING — TO ESTABLISH IN REALITY THE PEACE 
FOR WHICH THEY FOUGHT. IN VIEW OF THIS, WE 
DEDICATE OUR CHIMES TO THE FUTURE OF BEREA, 
AND IN THOSE WHO WILL BUILD THAT FUTURE WE 
HUMBLY PLACE OUR TRUST. 




President Francis S. Hut-chins 




THE CABINET 

Sitting: Julia Allen, Dean of Upper Division Women; Katharine True, Dean of Lower Division 
Women; Grace Wright, Dean of Foundation School Women; Adelaide Gundlach, 
Registrar 

Standing: Charles Shutt, Dean of Lower Division Men; Francis S. Hutchins, President of Berea 
College; Albert Weidler, Dean of Labor; Louis Smith, Dean of Upper Division Men. 
Roy Walters, Dean of Foundation School Men. 



OUR DEANS 




Upper Division . . . 

Julia Allen 
Dean of Women 

Louis Smith 
Dean of Men 



Lower Division . . . 

Katharine True 
Dean of Women 

Charles N. Shutt 
Dean of Men 



Foundation School . . 

Grace Wright 
Dean of Women 

Roy N. Walters 
Dean of Men 



ENGLISH . . . 

Emily Ann Smith 
Jerome W. Hughes 



ENGLISH . . . 

Earl W. Blank 
John W. Sattler 
Willis Wager 
Ernest J. Weekes 



ENGLISH . . . 

Maureen Faulkner 
Emma Reererts 
Hattie E. Stowe 



MATHEMATICS . . . 

Donald W. Pugsley 
William R. Hutcherson 
William Roberts 





PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION 

W, Gordon Ross 
George Noss 
J. Clayton Feaver 
Ira J. Martin 



HISTORY & POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Elisabeth Peck 
Willard Hogan 
Lee F. Crippen 



HOME ECONOMICS 

Marian Kingman 
Ruth Woods 
Agnes Aspnes 
Eunice True 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
John A. Henderson 

AGRICULTURE . . . 
Ray Orr 

MATHEMATICS . . . 
Theodore Wright 

ECONOMICS . . . 

William E. Newbolt 



BIOLOGY . . . 

John S. Bangson 
Hsi Wang 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Kate Forbes 

Minnie Maude Macaulay 



CHEMISTRY . . 

Henry B. Refo 
Julian H. Capps 



LANGUAGES . . . 

Charles E. Pauck 
Minnie Ledford 





ECONOMICS . . . 

Rector Hardin 
Albert G. Weidler 



HOSPITAL STAFF . . 

Dr. John Armstrong 
Dr. Ruby Helen Paine 
Dr. Harry Taylor 



EDUCATION . . . 

Albert J. Chidester 
Luther M. Ambrose 



AGRICULTURE . 

Claude Spillman 
Feaster Wolford 
Howard Monier 



HOME ECONOMICS 

Sarah Jane Hunter 
Jeanne Lindeman 

GEOLOGY . . . 
Wilbur G. Burroughs 



PSYCHOLOGY . 
Robert Ormsby 

PHYSICS . . . 

Waldemar Noll 
V. D. Roberts 



MUSIC . . . 
Margaret Allen 

HISTORY . . . 
Orrin L. Keener 




* IF 




MUSIC . . . 

Gladys Jameson 
Celia Kysela 
Richard Warner 
Frances Griffin 



MUSIC . . . 

Mary Anders 

Doris Vercoe 

Jean Vercoe Mulligan 

Mrs. J. W. Sorrier 



SOCIOLOGY . . . 

J. Wesley Hatcher 
Helen H. Dingman 
Francis H. Smith 



LANGUAGES . . . 

Charlotte P. Ludlum 
Margaret Chapin 
Elizabeth Richardson 




ART . . . 

Harriet Gill 
Mary Ela 
Max Miller 



FRENCH . . . 
Hubert Rieben 

ECONOMICS . . . 
Clarence Dawson 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS 
H. D. Schultz 



MATHEMATICS . . 

Ruth G. Simond 
Mary Emily Sinclair 

ECONOMICS . . . 
Esther Beck 



MATHEMATICS . 
Edward Taylor 




In remembrance of Mr. Benton Fielder who served Berea 
College from 1916 until his death in April, 1945. 



C'EST FINI. 

SOMETIMES RELUCTANTLY, SOMETIMES GLADLY WE HAVE TURNED 
THE PAGES OF THIS CHAPTER, SEEKING TO HOLD THE IN- 
EFFABLE SWEETNESS, YET FLEEING THE LONELINESS AND 
UNCERTAINTY OF THE LONG WAR YEARS. 
THIS IS THE YEAR WE HAVE REACHED FOR WITH MINDS 
AND FINGERS THAT LABORED UNTIL THE LONELY SOUND 
OF MIDNIGHT PASSED AND THE NIGHT WAS QUIET AGAIN 
WE HAVE RAMBLED ON BEREA'S HILLS. WE HAVE HELD 
RAIN IN CUPPED HANDS. WE HAVE TALKED WITH THE 
WIND. DANCED, DREAMED, LOVED, AND LEARNED 
WE HAVE ARGUED ABOUT POLITICS AND RELIGION, 
CLASS PRESIDENTS, ABOUT ALL THE OLD AND NEW PROBLEMS. 
THE ATOMIC BOMB SCARED US, MADE US CURIOUS, AND 
SOMETIMES WE WISHED IT HADN'T HAPPENED. 
WE HAVE KNOWN THE FULL BEAUTY OF CREATING WITH 
CLAY, WITH WORDS, WITH MUSIC. 

WE HAVE FELT THE DESPAIR AND LONELINESS OF WAITING 
FOR LETTERS WITH MYSTERIOUS A. P. O. 's. 
WE HAVE FELT THE GREAT JOY OF SHAPING OURSELVES 
INTO INDIVIDUALS A LITTLE LESS VAGUE, INTO A PATTERN, 
A PURPOSE, A DIRECTION THAT IS NOT NARROW, YET 
CERTAIN AND MEANINGFUL 
C'EST FINI. 

SO MUCH HAS HAPPENED THIS YEAR, THE END OF THE 
WAR, THE ATOMIC BOMB. 
AND NOW WE ARE GRADUATING, 
INDEED, IT IS FINISHED. 





Senior class officers 

Bobbie Hillman, Treasurer; Jack Buchanan, President; 
Florence Elam, Secretary; Tharon Musser, Vice-President. 



Mary Helen Adkins 
Huntington, W. Va. 
A.B., French 



Brigetti Auerbach 
New York N. Y. 
A.B., Chemistry 






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Dove Altizer 
Riner, Virginia 




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A.B., Sociology 


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Virginia Balden 




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Harrodsburg, Kentucky 






B.S., Home Economics 



SENIORS 



^valine Beck 
ineville, Ky. 
\.B., Chemistry 



Aabc\ Center Boehr 
lerea, Kentucky 
V.B., Sociology 



[athleen Browning 
isty, Kentucky 
k.B., Education 



immie Ruth Burton 
lamp Hill, Ala. 
..B., Sociology 



ernice Clark 
Williamson, West Va. 
S., Home Economics 




Florence Bcgley 
Bowlingtown, Kentucky 
B.S., Home Economics 



Marion Branum 
Andersonville, Tenn. 
A.B., Home Economics 



Jack Buchanan 
Barbersville, West Va. 
B.S., Agriculture 



Hilda Carter 

Jesup, Georgia 

A.B., Hist, and Pol. Sci. 



Jan Rose Cotton 
Jeffersontown, Kentucky 
A.B., Chemistry 



SENIORS 



Bob Coyle Crosswhite 
Berea, Kentucky 
A.B., English 



Lillian Davis 
Jacksboro, Tenn. 
A.B., History and Pol. 



Sci. 



Martin Doctor 
Chicago, III. 
A.B., Biology 



Frank Edwards 
Barnardsville, N. 
A.B., Philosophy 



Rosebelle Elkins 
North Plainfield, N. 
A.B., Psychology 




Helen Davis 
Beattyville, Ky. 
A.B., Chemistry 



Lucille Davis 
Jacksboro, Tenn. 
B.S., Home Economics 



Margaret Duncan 
Spruce Pine, N.C. 
A.B., Music 



Florence Elam 
Kimball, West Va. 
B.S., Home Economics 



Elyna Eller 
Wilkesboro, N. C. 
A.B., English 



SENIORS 



Amanda Jean Estepp 
Blackey, Kentucky 
A.B., Chemistry 



Elizabeth Fearing 
Ashland, Kentucky 
A.B., English 



Ruby Elliot Fleming 

Middleburg, Ky. 

B.S., Home Economics 



James Wing, 
Lincoln, Ala. 
A.B., Agriculture 



Lucy Goins 
Morganton, N. C. 
B.S., Home Economics 




Ruth Fair 
Liberty, Ky. 
A.B., Art 



Ruth Ferrill 
Louisville, Ky. 
A.B., Sociology 



Helen Forloine 
Ansted, West Va. 
B.S., Home Economics 



Virginia Godbey 
Salem, Virginia 
B.S., Home Economics 



Margaret Ann Graham 
Berea, Kentucky 
A.B., Sociology 



SENIORS 



Helen Elizabeth Gregg 
Kingsporr, Tennessee 
A.B., Physics 



Roberta Halcomb 
Viper, Kentucky 
B.S., Home Economics 



Jean Harris 
Pound, Virginia 
A. B., Chemistry 



Virginia Henderson 
Greenville, S. C. 
A.B., Mathematics 



Bobbie Irene Hillman 
Dungannon, Va. 
A.B., Biology 




Polly Gregg 

Kingsport, Tenn. 

A.B., Hist, and Pol. Sci. 



Joyce Hardin 
Spindale, N. C. 
A.B., English 



Lois Bassett Hartley 
Asheville, N. C. 
A.B., Mathematics 



Evelyn Hibbard 
Loyall, Kentucky 
A.B., Music 



Leonora A. Hoernlein 
Baltimore, Maryland 
A.B., Philosophy 



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SEN IORS 



ebckah Horton 
onton, N. C. 
B ., English 



zella Hurst 

Iden, Alabama 

.S., Home Economics 



iory Elizabeth Jones 
enova. West Va. 
B., Chemistry 



ancy Carolyn King 
noxville, Tenn. 
.B., English 



sther Werthimer Koff 
ong Beach, N. J. 
B., Hist, and Pol. Sci. 



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Elizabeth Hunt 
Gastonia, N. C. 
A.B., Psychology 



Kathleen Jett 
Richmond, Kentucky 
A.B., Music 



Nancy Carolyn Killough 
Mt. Pinson, Alabama 
A.B., Sociology 



Frederick W. Kirsch 

Berea, Ky. 

B.S., Agriculture 



Christine La Fon 
Oneonta, Alabama 
A.B., Home Economics 



SENIORS 



June Lane 
Clinchport, Va. 
A.B., Biology 



Aileen Lewis 
Roanoke, Virginia 
A.B., Economics 



Emogene Money 
Cane River, N. C. 
A.B., Hist, and Pol. Sci 



Alda Ruth Morris 
Huntsville, Alabama 
B.S., Home Economics 



Tharon Musser 
Burlington, Ky. 
A.B., English 




Marie Lay 
Hazard, Kentucky 
A.B., Biology 



Geraldine Lucas 
Huntington, West Va. 
B.S., Home Economics 



Geneva Metzler Matlock 

Paducah, Ky. 

B.S., Home Economics 



Pansy Fern Morton 
South Shore, Kentucky 
A.B., Biology 



Marian Nassau 
Ashland, Kentucky 
A.B., Sociology 



SENIORS 



Bill Norton 
Pleasant Hill, Tenn. 
B.S., Agriculture 



Ruby Parris 
Bryson City, N. C. 
A.B., Religion 



Mary Pierce 
Monticello, Ky. 
A.B., English 



Betty Jo Rankin 
Berwind, West Va. 
A.B., Biology 



Kathleen Roberts 
Stocksville, N. C. 
B.S., Home Economics 







James O'Dell 
Berea, Kentucky 
A.B., Philosophy 



Billa Jean Peters 

Lida, Ke-tucky 

B.S., Home Economics 



Helen Pulver 
Bogota, N. J. 
A.B., Geology 



Connie Roberts 
Concord, N. C. 
A.B., Home Economics 



Willadene Rominger 
Berea, Kentucky 
A.B., English 



SENIORS 



Bonnie Ruth Salisbury 
Salisbury, Kentucky 
B.S., Home Economics 



Ruth Schell 
Burlington, Ky. 
A.B., English 



Ruth Slusher 
Knoxville, Tenn. 
A.B., Biology 



Opalee Smith 
Leicester, N. C. 
8.S., Home Economics 



Nina Sprinkle 
Pennington Gap, Va. 
A.B., Mathematics 




Ruby Sasser 
Liberty, Ky. 
B.S., Home Economics 



Pauline Sloane 

Pikeville, Ky. 

B.S., Home Economics 



Olga Smith 
Owingsville, Kentucky 
A.B., Education 



Madge Sparks 
Jonesville, N. C. 
A.B., Home Economics 



Mary Stanley 

Beech Hill, West Va. 

A.B., Sociology 



SEN IORS 



Jane Threlkeld 
Harrodsburg, Kentucky 
A.B., Hist, and Pol. Sci. 



Rosemary Wetzel 
Caldwell, West Va. 
A.B., Hist, and Pol. Sci. 



Fanny Wilder 

Paint Lick, Kentucky 

A.B., Chemistry 



Forrest Vaughn Williams 
Paintsville, Kentucky 
A.B., Chemistry 



Patricia Williams 
Pikeville, Kentucky 
A.B., Home Economics 




Dorothy Tredcnnick 

Plainville, Conn. 

A.B., Hist, and Pol. Sci. 



Dorothy Jean Wheeler 
Ashland, Kentucky 
A.B., Hist, and Pol. Sci. 



Evalee Williams 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
A.B., Mathematics 



Ormar.d Williams 
Weaverville, N. C. 
B.S., Agriculture 



Anna Wills 
Beaver, West Va. 
A.B., Mathematics 



SENIORS 



Reno Yount 
Petersburg, West Vo. 
B.S., Home Economics 



Nancy Lois Covington 
Cookeville, Tenn. 



Elsie Zofer Hicks 
Stanford, West Va. 



Alice Kempf 
Parnell, Iowa 



Mary Ruth Mills 
Coeburn, Virginia 




Rachel Chaffin 
Hamilton, Ohio 



Sarah Harr 
Davis, West Va. 



Mary Sue Hillman 
Almyra, Arkansas 



Fannie Irene Martin 
Ruffsdale, Penn. 



Dorothy Russell 
New Port News, Va. 



WHEN WE FIRST SLIPPED INTO OUR JEANS, FOUND OUR LOUDEST SHIRT, SAUNT- 
ERED OFF WITH THE GANG FOR A "COKE," WE HAD THE FEELING THAT THIS WAS ONE 
OF OUR BIG YEARS AT COLLEGE . . . WE PLOWED INTO A U.D HANDBOOK AND 
FOUND THOSE PRIVILEGES WE'D HEARD SO MUCH ABOUT . . COULD WE HAVE BEEN 
A LITTLE SMUG WHEN WE SAID TO THAT SOPHOMORE, "WHY, MY DEAR-R, DIDN'T 
YOU KNOW— I'M U.D."? 

ADMISSION TO THE LIBRARY STACKS . . . BOARDING HALL, .CROSSROADS .OF THE 
WORLD, GARDEN SPOT OF THE UNIVERSE . . . GOLDTHWAITE PAST HISTORY HIKES 

TO ANY OUTPOST . LIGHTS BLAZING IN THEIR GLORY ALL NIGHT . THE TYM- 

PANI OF DISH PANS NO LONGER MEANING CHIPPED NAIL POLISH AND A FIFTY YARD 
SPRINT TO DRAPER IN THE PIN-STRIPED APRON. 

GOOD-BYE TO THE WAR-TIME ERA . . . GOOD-BYE TO THE NAVY— WHITE CAPS AMD 
BOOKS DEPOSITED ALONG THE WALL IN FRONT OF CHOW LINE— DEBRIS FROM THE 
SOJOURN— A CARD FROM THE CAPTAIN'S B^L, THE DIVING TOWER AT SEABURY. 

ENTER THE ONE-MAN COLOR GUARD . . . BOARD OF GOVERNORS AND U.D. SENATE 
MERGED TO U.D. COUNCIL, POUNDING RE3ULATIONS INTO SHAPE AND REALLY AC- 
COMPLISHING CHANGES . . TABLE CHATTER AT LAST DIVERTED FROM GRIPES ABOUT 
FOOD TO INTELLECTUAL DISCUSSIONS: I- THE TUBE CONTAINED A 1 r ', OF WATER 
INSTEAD OF A 3'; SOLUTION, WHY? AESCHYLUS VS. EURIPEDES; "AND SHOES AND 
SLIPS AND SEALING WAX" . . . THE END OF DILIBERATION OVER MAJORS, THE BE- 
GINNING OF "IT" . . . 





Junior Class Officers 

Maxine Jennings, Secretary; Oscar Davidson, President 1 ; Willard Arnett, Vice- 
President; Not in Picture — Hughes Spurlock, Treasurer. 



Joan Rowe, Frank Seto, Orrin Taulbee, 
Willard Arnette, Lillie Margaret 
Press'ey, Nina Clark, Annie Sue 
O'Daniel. 



Irene Pigman, Margery Murphy, 
Mable Wright, Doris Neal, Lucile 
Crumpler, Lois Haun, Lela Taylor. 




Jean Bright, Zenobia Hope, Carol 
Coapman, Eleanor Zipf, Ruth Liddle, 
Mary Stylos, Virginia Sanders, Dor- 
othy Medich. 



Edna Lee Lambert, Sam Hurst 
Dorothy Ison, Harry Bailey, Aline 
Goodwin, Bill Ledford. 





Garneta Shannon, June Stanley, Lou- 
ise Proffit, Mary Elizabeth Cordier, 
Frances Barkley, Sadie Kathrine 
Cordier, Wilene Kinsey. 



Sally Talbot, Margaret Susong, Jua- 
nita Noland, Helen Nicholas, Lorraine 
Salyer, Betty Holbert, Gayle Asher, 
Margie Davis. 



Dorothy Baldwin, Gladys Buchanan, 
Christine Jones, Betty Shufflebarger, 
Juanita Cooper, Gladys Ogle. 



Chester Newsome, Norma York, Col- 
lete Rieben, Kirk Adams. 



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Jean Clark, Hughes Spurlock, Frances 
Finnell, Nancy Jo McGuire, Ruth 
Burnett, Esther Spence, Mary Lou 
Keener. 



Eloise Oliver, Peggy Hicks, Frances 
Bradshaw, Betty Lou Powers, Jo 
Richards, Roberta Messer, Oscar 
Davidson 




Eileen Hartley, Alice Russell, Maxine 
Jennings, Kendric Smith, Gretka 
Young, Ruth Steinberg, 



Mary Ellen Ayer, Dorothy Palmer, 
Harriet Hoffman, Eleanor Knotts, 
Alta Whitt, Scharlene Oney. 





Sophomore nurses — Gertrude Sayior, Mary Virginia Lecky, Elwanda Dalton, 
Marjorie Page, June Hux, Vivian Cottle. 



Freshman nurses — Marian Davis, Alma Stephenson, Alice Simpson, Hazel 
Ann Dawson, Betty Ammons, Faye Skean, Cleda Pen- 
nington, Miss Wyfie, Vangie Noe, Sadie Luttrell. 




OUR LAST YEAR IN LOWER DIVISION THE LAST YEAR WE'LL SAY THE LORD'S 

PRAYER WITH DEAN SHUTT AT THE OPENING OF MEN'S CONFERENCE LAST YEAR 

WE'LL LOOK AT THE SCHEDULE ON THE BULLETIN BOARD IN DRAPER . . . ALL THIS, 
OF COURSE, IF WE PASS. 

U.D. HOLDS OUT MRS. PECK'S WAY OF MAKING HISTORY LIVE . . . OR J. CLAYTON 
FEAVER'S WAY OF KILLING IT: 200 BC, ABRAHAM LEFT UR, 1800 BC, GRADUAL IN- 
FILTRATION INTO CANAAN, 1600 BC, ENTRANCE INTO EGYPT . . . I WONDER IF I'VE 
BALLED IT UP ALREADY. 

BUT WHY WORRY ABOUT BOOKS. IT'S MORE FUN TO JAM INTO PAT'S AFTER THE 
SATURDAY NIGHT MOVIE, SINK OUR TEETH INTO THE WARMTH OF A HAMBURGER 
SHOVED THROUGH THE WINDOW AT FRAU FISH'S . . . OR OBSERVE VAN JOHNSON IN 
THE POPCORN AND WAILING— BABIES ATMOSPHERE OF THE WEST END CINEMA. 
THERE'S A LOT TO LOOK FORWARD TO. TWO WHOLE YEARS BEFORE WE GRADUATE, 
BEFORE LIFE IS OVER. TWO WHOLE YEARS TO GO ON, AND WITH ADDITIONAL 
PLEASURES. 

WELL, WE'VE QUIT THE LOWER DIVISION IN A BIG YEAR THE WORLD IS QUIET AT 
LAST . . . ALMOST THE FIRST TIME IN OUR SCHOOL CAREER WHEN WE CAN RE- 
MEMBER A NEWSCAST NOT BEGINNING "AN ADVANCE OF FIFTEEN KILOMETERS WAS 
CLAIMED NORTH OF—." IN GERMANY THEY WORRY ABOUT FRATERNIZATION: IN 
THE PACIFIC THE PRICE OF SOUVENIRS SKYROCKETS. SO SOON WE GO BACK TO 
READING THE FUNNIES AND IGNORING THE FRONT PAGE. 

THEN THERE ARE THE PEOPLE WE'LL REMEVBER; THE CLASS PRESIDENT WHO PROM- 
ISED TO "GET THIS MEETING OVER IN A HURRY" . . . THE REDHEAD WHO PLUGGED 
OUR SOCIALS . . . THE BOYS WITH THE BEARDS . . . FOOLISH LOOKING SIGMA PI SIGMA 
INITIALS, THE LAST OF THE CADET NURSES . . . LOWER DIVISION SENATORS . . . 
YES, IT WAS A BIG YEAR, BUT WE'RE LOOKING TO THE FUTURE AND HUNTING FOR 
OUR PLACE IN UPPER DIVISION. 





SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS . . . 

Margo Southard, Treasurer; Ethel Cantrell, Secretary; Woody Reed, President, 
Billie Sue Davis, Vice-President, ( not in picture) 




Doris Adler, Kay 
Abels, Hilda Lane, 
Margaret Sue Fer- 
rington, Alma 
Tankersley, Hilda 
Ba Idock, Joyce 
Reedy, June Settle, 
Joan Shomo, Mar- 
garet Love, Barbara 
Goddard, Pat Nicely, 
Dorothy Davis, Mar- 
go Southard, Mariet- 
ta Purkey, Margaret 
Davis, Lois Speer, 
Emily Huff. 



Mary Frances French, Libby 
Watts, Jeannette Austin, Ra 
mona Layne, Alice Franklin, 
Jack Hale, Charlotte Johnson, 
Doris Swingle, Jennie Fitz 
patrick, Florence Baker. 



Lilburn Goode, Dora Campbell, 
Eleanor Hall, Mary Abodeely, 
Harry Dodd, Glenn Lively, 
Kenneth Poteat, Billy Hiatt. 



Woody Reed, Marion Van 
Winkle, Jane Bishop, Dahlia 
Sexton, Doris Messer, Jimmie 
Hines, Bob Robinson, Helen 
Barnes, Marvette Davis. 





Ella Foster, Lourdes Ossorio, 
Mary Hazel Phillips, Cordelia 
Slusher, Clinton Ramey, Jose 
Rubio, Wanda Eskew, Nancy 
Furry, Aileen Sloan. 



Dean Lambert, James Hall, 
Robert Fisher, Norrean Smith, 
Arietta Hogan, Clinton Clay, 
Elsie Coffey, Barbara Hill, Betty 
Ann Hixon, Phyllis Jones, Mo- 
dine Smith, Martha Williams. 



Mary Catherine Frye, Betty 
Broadbooks, Margaret Frye, 
Ethel Cantrell, Marjorie Moss, 
Anne Hayes, Sammye Stur- 
divant. 



Alberta Thomas, Frances Ed- 
wards, Polly Brooks, Eunice Van 
Winkle, Helen Cawood, Rissie 
Faye Layne, Mary Frances Sha- 
fer, Paul Taylor, Julia Thomas, 
Gene Ballenger. 



Reuben Hunter, Pat Finn, Elayne 
Waters, George Anah Stewart, 
Reva McMillion, Nancy Brooks, 
Joyce Lockhart, Joan Bridges, 
Theda Taylor, Anna Johnson, 
Georgia Ruth Roberts, Billie Sue 
Davis, Jeanne Hardy, Helen 
Dellinger, Margaret Ann Mul- 
key, Haze! Reynolds 



Etta Cundiff, Janice Stamper, 
Marion Haynes, Juanita Ketch- 
ersid, Faye Ritchie, Jean Crouch- 
er, Alonzo Moore, Merle Stanley, 
Irene Robbins, Dorothy Amey, 
Jean Smith, Betty Jean Morgan. 





Nelle Davis, Betty Pierce, Vir- 
ginia Morris, Helen Smith, Mary 
Lou Smith, Sylvia Sewell, Dor- 
othy York, Miriam Mann, Kath- 
leen Beverly, May Watts, Ellen 
Watts. 




We honor Mr. J. Wesley Hatcher 
who was a member of the Berea 
College faculty from 1925 until 
his retirement in June, 1946. 



MELLOW SEPTEMBER TO CHEERFUL JUNE— PAGES OF DAYS BEING TURNED SWIFTLY 
MONDAY'S COIFFEUR DONE IN THE SWIMMING POOL— TUESDAY'S SCHOOL CHAPELS 
—PAINSTAKING INTRODUCTION TO THE HANDBOOK, "TO BE TAKEN LITERALLY"— 
MIMEOGRAPHED READING LISTS — LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCE HALL— TWO HOURS 
WITH A MICROSCOPE HUNTING FOR THE AMOEBA, ELUSIVE MICROBE — CAREFREE 
MOUNTAIN DAY DOTTED WITH WHITE NAVY HATS— EFFORTS TO RESIST THE COFFEE 
HABIT— BEETS AND PEAS AND OODLES OF TABLETS AT THE HOSPITAL; ANNEX ROOM 4 
—RAIN AND SNOW AND SUNSHINE— CHAPEL TARDINESSES AND CHURCH ABSENCES- 
GARY COOPER FROM THE BALCONY OF PHELPS-STOKES-TRAIN AND BUS SCHEDULES 
NORTH, SOUTH, EAST AND WEST— SUNDAY AFTERNOON HAMBURGERS AT THE HANG- 
OUT WITH "CHICKERY CHICK" FROM THE JUKE BOX — FLASHES OF DEEP GRATITUDE 
FOR PEACE — FLITTING THOUGHTS ABOUT WORLD-ORGANIZATION— POST-WAR IN- 
CREASE IN POPULATION ATTESTED BY THE RISE OF THE "DRAPER ROAD COTTAGES"— 
RUMORS OF NYLONS THAT PRECEDING CLASSES DIDN'T HEAR — COLLEGE FRESHA.'EN 
FEELING A WEE-BIT PICAYUNE AT THE OUTSET OT THE ATOMIC AGE— LETTERS HOME 
SAYING "JUST TWO MORE WEEKS AND I'LL BE A SOPHOMORE"— 






FRESHMAN OFFICERS . . . 

Marjorie Keener, Treasurer; Helen Swanson, Vice-President; 
Fred Chapman, President; Genevieve Graham, Secretary. 




Betty Warming, Arthel Gray, 
Jean Butler, Charlene Mullins, 
Marie Hayes, Jewell Phillips, 
Janice Pigman, Armenda Rob- 
bins, Lucy Stewart, Ann Bray. 



Betty Williams, Chessie Wright, 
Mary Sue Baker, Beatrice Lov- 
ette, Dale Dedmon, Juliet Lewis, 
Jane Propps, Martha Fry, Bad- 
gette Dillard, Esther Richardson, 
Cleda Brock, Sarah Williams, 
Marbeth Peters, Rose Adachi 



Janrose Sherman, Max Hessel- 
gesser, Lavaun Halsey, Pauline 
Deal, Rossie Drummond, Mary 
Shuttle, Charles Keyser, Elmer 
Young, Harry Shaw, Doyle 
Sharpton, Daisy Lisenbee, Bob 
Lewis, David Cotrona. 



He'en Burnett, Aloma Barnes, 
Flora Cofield, Miquel E. Ta- 
mayo, Peggy Ann Johnson, 
Roberto Casablanca, Bennie 
Tipton, Ted Smith, Herman 
Patterson, Wayne Proffitt, Ruth 
Begley. 





Flaine Charles, Jacqueline Hay- 
den, Jean Watson, Ruby Camp- 
bell, Martha Zoellers, Wanda 
Hammon, Eleanor Sibold, Joe 
Bush, Pat Mason. 



Effie Taylor, Nila May Blair, 
Herbert Moore, Jean Morgan, 
Frances Barnett, Pat Moore, 
Edwina Chiles, Leonard Oxier, 
Cloyd Eastham, Linzee Packard. 



Earl Woods, Jean Dawson, Jessie 
Hibbitts, Guindola Johnson, El- 
bert Miller, David Holroyd, 
Ingvi Gretar, Donald Murphy, 
Jerry Crouch, Glenn Harris, 
Arthur Wiggins. 




Norvelle Sharpe, Anna Wick- 
line, Virginia Hewlett, Mary 
Alice Peters, Margaret Trumbo, 
Dorothy Brannon, Helen Webb, 
Dorothy Morrow, Clara Eppard, 
Enola Foley, Faye Feltner, Ma- 
bel Pollard, Gladys Reece 



Jane Midkiff, Howard Tollison, 
Maxine Chadwell, Ruth Barnes, 
Evelyn McQueen, Betty Lou 
Partin, Louise Wardrep, Edith 
Lester, Vandeta Vanover, Rachel 
Teague, Coleman Jeffers, 
Nancye Rose, Jo Ella Wolfe, 
Bill Leake, Lucille Martin 



Jo Ann Gouge, Catherine French, 
Elizabeth Palmer, Lemma Cox, 
Helen Sweet, Mildred Green. 




Edith Clayton, Lewis Rogers, 
Gladys Sosebee, Virginia Hylton, 
Ray Feltner. 



Sara Hendrix, Alton Noblett, 
Joan Ferry, Alfred Swanson, 
Allan Demaree, Louise Corn, 
Norma Morris, Rosa Lee Case, 
James Dowdy, Ross Andrews, 
Forrest Jarrett, Jim Warrick, 
Sam McNeil, Russell Hennessee. 



Carolyn Henderson, Betty Con- 
ner, Roberta Parkins, Elizabeth 
Shepherd, Audrey Preston, Mar- 
jorie Harrison, Frances Scales, 
Lillian Moore, Argie De Simone, 
Eleanor Panter, Janet Marsh, 
Peggy Talbot, Mary Frances 
Yount. 



Helen 0. Smith, Ruth Slover, 
Elizabeth Boughton, Christine 
Chadwell, Virginia Jo Crutch- 
field, Amanda Clark, Edna Sims, 
Alice Neal, Ronda Allen, Martha 
Hutcherson, Patricia Brooks, 
Ruth Schulze. 



Nora Lee Maddux, Cornelia 
Loven, Pauline Whitaker, Char- 
line Whitaker, Bob Webb, 
Marvin Compton, Norma Hold- 
er, Ned Holder. 



Jane Van Scoyk, Gladys Walker, 
Nancy Lisenbee, Juanita Pen- 
land, Audrey Shaw, Elizabeth 
Tally, Mary Esther Tally, John 
Welsh, Jessie Downs, Naomi 
Eppard, Berniece Kirstein 





Jean Burnett, Eleanor Cipolla, 
Toby Woolums, Jo Anne Wat- 
son, Jimmie Mallonee, Bill 
Parks, Avenell Rose, Martha 
Rogers, Mary Golden Saferight, 
Gray Parks, Bill Collawn, Her- 
schel McDaniels, Arnold Buck- 
ley, Bob Johnston. 



Janice Osborne, Ouida Hughes, 
Marjorie Holcombe, William 
Baucom, Garland Thayer. 



John Woody, Glenna Ray, Mar- 
garet Templin, Dorothea Noss, 
Bob Norsworthy, Herbert Strong, 
Mary Lunghofer. 



WE ARE GROWN UP NOW ... AT LEAST ALMOST ... WE ARE READY FOR COLLEGE 
NEXT YEAR ... OF FOR A JOB ... OR FOR THE ARMY. OR SOME OF US MIGHT EVEN 
BEGIN A HOME OF OUR OWN . . . THIS IS THE END . . . BUT IT IS REALLY MORE OF A 
BEGINNING THAN AN ENDING . . . THE BEGINNING OF SOMETHING WE HAVE BEEN 
REACHING FOR ... THE TOP OF A HILL WITH SO MUCH ON THE OTHER SIDE THAT 
WE'LL NEVER GET TO TASTE THE SWEETNNESS OF IT ALL . . . AND YES, IT'S AND END- 
ING, TOO, AND MEMORIES OF FALLS WHEN THE CAMPUS WAS STREWN WITH DAMP 
YELLOW DRIFTS OF WITHERED LEAVES AND THE MAPLES WERE LONELY, NAKED 
SKELETONS IN THE COOL DRIZZLE OF A NOVEMBER MORNING . . . IT'S THE BEGIN- 
NING OF A BIGGER WORLD . . . MORE FREEDOM . . . LESS DIRECTION . . . MORE RE- 
SPONSIBILITY . . . WITH THE MEMORY OF CLIMBING WEST PINNACLE AND FEELING 
A LITTLE CLOSER TO GOD UP THERE ON TOP OF THE MOUNTAIN. IT'S THE HOPE 
THAT WE'LL FIND A PLACE IN THE WORLD ... A LITTLE NICHE THAT WE FILL PER- 
FECTLY . . OR ONE THAT WE CAN PREPARE OURSELVES TO FILL ... ITS SO MUCH, OH, 
SO VERY MUCH MORE THAN WORDS CAN MEASURE. 









12TH GRADE OFFICERS . . . 
Raymond Bradbury, Vice- 
President; Mary Bowling, 
Secretary; Bill Morgan, 
Treasurer; Thomas Spill- 
man, President. 



Lola Sholar, Sam Horton, George 
Fillmore, Scott Collins, Gene 
Burton, Grace Chambers, Kath- 
ryn Morgan, Minnie Lee Sand- 
ers, Miriam Crowe. 




Josephine Beck, Jean Hayes, 
Aileen Saylor, William Eicker, 
Florence Ison, Myrl Skaggs, 
Lillian Young. 



Bill Blessing, Tom Spillman, 
Joyce Pennington, E. G. Fish, 
Pat Justice, Joanne Warriner, 
Max Gatewood. 



Paul Clarkston, Betty Wegener, 
David Douglass, Violet Baker, 
Mary Bowling, Martha Daniels, 
Jane Huddleston, Richard Park- 
er, Kathleen Scott. 





Pat Dawson, Leonore Noll, 
Mario Ossorio, Sara Beth Crain, 
Gloria Hudlow, Imogene Fear- 
now, Clarice Miniard, Lucille 
Ross, Hazel Dause, Howard 
Stevens. 



Logan Shell, Clara White, Mary 
Hurst, Georgia Baird, Pat 
Muncy, Betty Pearl, Phyliss 
Daniels, Edna Hicks, Mary 
Elizabeth Campbell, Leila Cain, 
Beverly Taylor. 



JUST A CLASS OF "IN-BETWEENS" . . . WE'RE BEGINNING TO FEEL THE WEIGHT OF 
LAST YEARS IN HIGH SCHOOL AND WONDER ABOUT THE FUTURE . . . WHAT'S IT TO 
BE? . . . FOUNDATION IS A THING OF THE PAST . . . AND TO THIf \Y WE'RE GOING TO 
STEP INTO THE ROLE OF SENIORS ... IT SEEMS LIKE ONLY YESTERDAY THAT THEY 
WERE PUSHING US INTO THAT COURSE OR THE OTHER . . . BUT NOW WE BEGIN TO 
FEEL THE DIGNITY THAT HAS BEEN BEQUEATHED TO US . . . 

JUST A CLASS OF "IN-BETWEENS" . . . BUT IT HAS BEEN MORE THAN THAT TO US . 
OUR CLASS HAS A FEELING THAT IS MORE UNIFIED ... WE HAVEN'T HAD TO STAND 
BY AND WATCH OUR CLASSMATES OF THE MASCULINE SEX LEAVE US . . . WE'VE HAD 
MORE OF A BALANCE IN OUR CLASS DISCUSSIONS, SOCIALS, AND WHAT NOT 
NOW THAT PEACE HAS COME MAYBE WE CAN REMAIN TOGETHER ... WE CAN SEE 
THAT ALL THE PROBLEMS AREN'T SETTLED . . . THAT GIVES US MORE PEASON TO 
GO ON UNTIL WE CAN FIND THE WAYS TO HFLP SOLVE THEM . . . 

MAYBE WE'RE JUST A CLASS OF "IN-BETWEENS" . . . BUT WE'VE FOUND OUT THE 
ROPES AS WELL AS ANY ... WE KNOW THE BEAUTIFUL FEELING OF SEEING SEVERAL 
LETTERS TUCKED UNDER OUR DOORS OR IN OUR MAIL BOXES . . . WE'VE LEARNED 
OUR SHARE OF TRICKS . . . WE'VE EATEN MULTIPLIED DOZENS OF DOUGHNUTS AND 
LOAVES OF Bl ENRICHED . . . AND WHAT ABOUT THAT LABOR ASSIGNMENT WE GOT 
"ROOKED IN" . . . THAT'S LEARNING ... IT ISN'T PLATO, OF COURSE, BUT IT'S SOME- 
THING THAT MAKES US THINK WE CAN ACCEPT THE "SENIORS' KEY TO SUCCESS", 
AND WHO KNOWS, WE MIGHT POLISH A FEW OF THOSE TARNISHED SPOTS' EH, KIDS? 





11TH GRADE OFFICERS . . . 

William Hanger, President; Hugo Miller, Vice-President; 
Patricia Langford, Secretary; John Bradbury, Treasurer. 




Wyldine Williams, Dortha Hyde, 
B e r n i c e Smith, Helen May 
Patrick, Ann Prestwood, Norma 
Calico, Bennie Herd, Bob Har- 
mon, Dil'ard Feltner, Clayton 
Anderson, Shirley Baker. 



1- 










B'll Hanger, Patricio Longford, 
I lez Black, John Bradbury, Jane 
Pobison, Betty Gevedon, Edith 
Morgan, Faye Kegley, Jeanne 
Fosterling, Nellie Campbell, 
Hvigo Miller, Numia Bradley, 
Georgia Mae Cox, Evelyn Goins. 



A n d r e w Nicholaus, Maxine 
D o v i s , Bill Evans, Laferne 
l.outhan, Inez Jenkins, Mabel 
Correll, Gladys Hubbard, Grace 
Johnson. 



Anna Sparkman, Donald Clay- 
pool, Chad Perry, Faye Burton, 
Lola Litton, Mildred Pennington, 
Loraine Campbell, Hazel Graff, 
Jane Nantz, Ethel Pearson, 
Christine Purcell, Ruth Ann Van 
CI eve, Betty Lovelace, Bettv 
Jean Finnell. 




Randall Williams, Robert Jones, 
Patsy Pullins, Forrest Rice, 
Clyne Nolan, Donald Holmes. 



Emma Robertson, Olvia Smith, 
Roberta Williams, Bill Williams, 
Edna Wilder, Jane Robinson, 
Betty Dillon, Margaret Johns, 
Mabel Baker, Larry Arnett, Betty 
Wallen, Jenny Fain. 




A DAY — KALEIDOSCOPIC — WALKING AND SLEEPING TO THE 
TUNE OF THE BOOGIE WORN PIANO— FLASHES OF COCKROACHES IN 
TALCOTT, SUCEEDING "CROPS" OF PRACTICE TEACHERS, ENGLISH, 
HISTORY, OR WHAT HAVE YOU — DEEP CHAIRS AND SOFT SYMPHONY 
IN THE READING ROOM — LONG TRIPS ACROSS THE CAMPUS — TO 
TYPING ON THIRD FLOOR DRAPER — PHY. ED. AT SEABURY AND 
WOODS-PEN. — LONG SHAFTS OF LIGHT AND SHADOW AROUND 
INDUSTRIAL ON SNOWY NIGHTS — QUICK TRIPS TO THE STREET 
DOWN "BACK STAIRWAYS"— A FIRST DATE WALKING HOME FROM 
SUNDAY NIGHT CHAPEL— THOSE HOURS CF STUDY— AND SO TO BED. 




MINUTES WELL AND GROW AND SPILL LIKE TEARS, 
WASHING THE MARKS OF PAIN FROM THE CHEEKS OF MEMORY 

Doris Speck Adler 



MATRIMONY 

Love you? You who call me "turtle head"? 

Poke fun at my hair in pins? 

Yes. I love you ! 

I laugh with you. 

You are right. 

I guess I do look odd at night. 

— Eileen Hartley 



BEREA SPRING 

Spring is a hard-to-wind mechanical toy, an animated puppet. 

Swift in early pace, playful and abrupt. 

Queenly magnolia bows, 

Nipped leaves protest, 

Iris shiver 

When the toy runs down . . . 

When the strings hang limp, 

Wisteria is a brown ghost, dismayed, 

With no hope of purple resurrection. 

What have you to say . . . 

You who wind the toy . . . you who hold the strings? 

Silver birch apologies, 

Sweet gum . . . locust . . . oak regrets, 

And recompense in the white arch of wild blackberry in bloom 

Are not these proof that the toy has been rewound? 

— Dorothy Tredennick 



McGILLICUDY WAS A SAILOR 

The first day I walked into that math class, I was determined to be prepared for any and 
all kinds of greetings that I was sure to get in a room filled with Navy men. But once I got 
steeled to their comments, I began to look the field over in my own meek way. I noticed 'The 
Mick' first. He looked like the fleet. There was one word to describe him, and that was 

// All 

crude . 

I usually entered the class at a strategic three minutes before the bell. 'The Mick', in 
one on the aisle, would stretch his legs way out, slump in his seat, and with yellow hair over 
one risque blue eye, and square jaw propped up on a fist, he would prepare to leer at me. 
"Some doll," his eyes said, as he did an about face in his seat and smiled significantly. 

I never knew 'The Mick' through his mind, through what he thought or hoped or dreamed 
of. He stood out as a superb work of mother nature, a bit of a wise guy, and an authority on 
tactics, naval and otherwise. 



Our first Saturday night date, man about town with the dissipated look turned out to be 
a little boy not used to the ladies. He was scrubbed and shy, and tripped over words, al- 
though he was the smoothest dancer I had ever come across. 

'The Mick' had a reserved seat in the underworld, I knew that. He was the kind of a 
guy, I told my friends, who wasn't worth a canful of garbage, and I certainly wouldn't want to 
spend the rest of my life with him. But when 'The Mick' stopped thinking that I was "some 
doll", and became just another navy blue figure on campus, something inside me said, "You 
don't want him, but you'll love him the rest of your life." 

j — Ruth Steinberg 



AWARENESS 

Today 

I saw a flaming, red-hued bush 

In the middle of a broad, green field. 

I smiled, 

Remembering that I find you so 

In a room filled with people. 

— Dorothy Tredennick 



SONNET ON INDIFFERENCE 

I do not care! It matters not to me 

That he has chos'n to throw his life away; 

To toss about among the chaff, as free 

As dust, content to land where'er he may. 

Resolved, have I, to disregard his state 

Of wanton wandering — to reinforce 

My will, unthrall my mind, obliterate 

All thoughts of him, and rise! Without remorse. 

But piercing thoughts intrude and oft have gained 

Admittance to some remote and unexplored 

Compartment of the soul, caressed the cove, 

And there beneath the struggle lie sustained: 

A force destroying petty wants, the chord 

Which ultimately gains — Unaltered Love! 

— Eleanor Knotts 



"CARRIED AWAY" 

Long slim fingers on ivories moved quickly, creating fantastic rhythmic patterns — 
syncopation — against a background of rumbling bass notes. Boogie Woogie. You listen; 
rhythm takes hold of you. Feet move — faster — faster; body vibrates — skirt whirls — hair flies 
— you shout — you're wild! Music stops. Rhythm turns you loose and you're back to 

reality — an exhausted Jitterbug. 

Long slim fingers on ivories move slowly and melt into deep rich chords. Unbroken lines 
of melody flow smoothly with tone swelling and dying away. You listen; melody gets you and 
takes you on an imaginative tour — lifts your soul above the clouds — higher — higher. Music 
stops. Melody still holds you — won't let you go. You're filled with it and you go on your 
way humming — humming melody. 

— Bobbv Crosswhite 



IF I HAD DARED 

Darkness, 

Heavy, 

Suffocating me with the weight of memories; 

Thickest blackness forcing me to my knees 

with your weight; 
The night brings you in on her shoulders 
And spreads your thickness over me . . . 
I feel you blotting out the details of my daily life . . . 
Forcing me to feel the burden of the acts 

I might have done, 
The person that I might have been ... if I had dared to be. 

— Harriet Hoffman 



SUMMERTIME 

When the idle dreamer is forced by the hard coldness of winter to retire within his four 
walls and while away his time, nothing can bring back pleasant day-dreams so well as the 
haunting melody of Gershwin's "Summertime." This tune captures some of the dreamy 
languor of summer. 

As I listen, I see long rows of cotton under the sun. The "darkies" are singing mournful 
tunes in rhythm to the regular rise and fall of their hoes. Occasionally one raises his head 
and a long chanting melody flows from his lips. The sun shines hot, and the field stretches 
wide on all sides. A small cloud of dust hazes over the scene, and lengthening shadows crawl 
across the landscape. The scene drifts into golden obscurity . . . summertime. 

The golden haze becomes a cloud of dust aroused by a passing car. I walk down a nar- 
row dusty lane with trees on either side, their leaves heavy with dust and heat. In the clear 
sky a few buzzards drift, circling lazily. A grasshopper chirps drearily from the edge of the 
road. My shirt, soaked with sweat, clings to my back; however, the heat of the sun has a pleas- 
antly penetrating feel on the arms and shoulders. Ahead of me the river gleams through the 
dark twisted pillars of the tree trunks. The sand crunches softly beneath my feet. A snak 
e slips silently into the water, its head creatinga ripply "V" on the surface; the head of a 
floating turtle ducks hurriedly; upstream a fish plops. At an easy pace I strip, laying my 
clothes on a log of driftwood, bleached white by the sun. The water is relaxingly cool as it 
climbs higher on my heated body. The frogs begin to sing, and the shadows are long . . . 
summertime. 

A white thunderhead towers into the evening sky. Its undersides become dark as it 
covers the sun. A yellow bolt zig-zags earthward; the thunder clashes likes a monstrous 
kettle-drum. The hard rain pelts down. Gusts of wind send the branches into orgies of thrash- 
ing. Leaves whirl heavenward, spinning madly. The air is cool and sweet with the smell of 
summer rain. Rumbling, the thunderhead retreats, allowing the golden sun to gild the dripping 
leaves. There is silence except for the drip of water from the trees. Slowly the day heats 
again. The clouds turn gold, red, and finally purple . . . summertime. 



The sky is black and soft, like velvet. The stars scattered across it ore big and compan- 
ionable A full moon rides high shedding its mellow light over the earth Through the air 
surges a warm wind; shadows are danging in the long grass. The urge ernes to dance with 
them until I can dance no longer. The drone of the night insects joins the chorus of frogs 
from the river. The dew falls, wetting the grass; the shadows deepen; an own hoots mourn- 
fully . . . summertime. 

The leaves of the trees hang listlessly in the hot air. The sky is dotted with unmoving 
cottony clouds. Beneath the trees the grass is soft to the body. A small bug crawls up a 
grass-stem, spreads its wings, and buzzes away. A line of ants meanders through the stems. 
The leaves rustle in a little breeze which cools the sweat of the forehead. Flies buzz mo- 
notonously. The sun beats down. 

"Summertime, and the living was easy. 

Fish were jumping, and the cotton was high — " 

Slowly the song fades into nothingness. 

— Jerry Crouch 



NON-CONFORMISTS 

The mountain was steep. 

Fallen leaves — brown, orange, and yellow — 

Were deep where we would climb. 
Brambles and briers, shrubs and trees, both growing and felled 

Said 

"You cannot tread here'" 

No path is necessary. 

Obstacles are overlooked. 

The lure of heights, beauty, and exploration 

Pulls the adventurous soul to its destiny. 

The nature of the spirit of man 

Is greater than that of the universe — 

The cycle — bud, flower, death, decay. 
What can keep the destined spirit^'from its goal ? 
Who shall accuse them, the non-conformists 

Who tramp onward past natural barriers which 
Shout 

"You cannot tread here!"? 



-Marjorie Jean Keener 



SPENDTHRIFT 

The late evening air is saturated with rich sunlight, distilled from the long summer's 
drowsy abundance. It strikes long shadows across grass already wet with dew. Soft light 
touches the rtillness of unmoving trees with the rich eolers of old oil painting. The grass 
softens the fall of my feet, a dry leaf now and then crackling where I step. A mist is settling 
; n the val'ey below my hill, and a coolness seasons the air. 

This is the time for pulling out soft wooly sweaters and woolen skirts from attic trunks 
redo'ent with mothballs. Time for going home, time for filling coal buckets from the pile 
beside a dry has-been garden. This is an excuse for building fires in summer-cold grates, for. 



closing windows to snugness as dry Ifcaves skitter across the window outside. It is a time for 
outside work, letting dishes stack in the sink and dust settle on furniture. There is a yard 
drifted full of leaves which must be raked into p ; les, exposing scattered pecans from the matron 
trees in the withering grass underneath. There are leaves to be lifted in dusty armfuls, stamped 
down in bushel baskets which must be carried to the blue-graveled drive, dumpted in a wind- 
tumble heap and fired with a blazing newspaper. 

Teeth gritty with dust, blistered hands, eyes smarting from eddying smoke, I draw from an 
unlimited source of strength, unsparing of my body. For there is such an abundance of life in 
me I can never tire. Sunlight on my back burns through my sweater. My sympathies are 
with the grasshopper who sang while the sun was ripe, pitying the ant whose living was all in 
the future. I exult in my strength and youth who have so much to spare I can fling it away 
like handfuls of gold. How can I ever grow old? I that am so free, so conscious of vitality, 
so drunk with being? Nature echoes my mood; spendthrift too, she lavishly burns her candle 
at both ends, exulting in the wine richness of life that sings in her veins, throwing armfuls of 
her abundance in luxuriant color on the lazy earth. With so much life, how can she grow 
old? 

Those who are old were born old; I will never be old. But winter comes, and I am only 
made of bones and flesh. 

— Eileen Hartley 

THE FIELDS OF FALL 

The fields of fall, 
Brown, shock-studded, 
Stretching away 
Dim in the haze 
Of the dust-ridden air. 
Linked with scents — 
Dry, dusty hay; 
Pngent smoke, 
Drifting into the hollows 
Straight and still. 
The dusty road, 
Winding across the fields. 
The sun, redly setting 
Among the ruddy woods. 
The hills, 

Blue and dim and distant. 
— Jerry Crouch 



LETTER TO MINA 

New York, 
June, 1930 

Beloved Mina 

It is unspeakably foolish of me to write this letter, I suppose; this letter, which can do 
little good; which you, who have been dead twelve months, can never read; this letter, whose 
contents I shall so soon be able to give you in person. 

Yet it is an explanation, this letter, which has been owed you from the start. 

You must remember, Mina, that I am at heart a gentile soul. Surely you, in your 
understanding of me as no other person ever understand me, can know how hard it has been for 
me to realize what happened. 



It is strange, in these months since I poisoned you, how you have come to stand before me 
again and again; in the little alcove; in the car; in the dark quiet of the living room as the 
twilight hour which you so loved sets in. How I have remembered you — in all the places we 
were together in those first mad days when we realized we loved each other . . . that street 
where I bought you the gardenia before the party; the funny little man with the organ grinder, 
who played "Over the Waves" . . . the soft light on your hands at the club, while the busy 
waiters went by and the champagne foamed in the glasses 

At first, in the hurt, bewildered days after I murdered you, I hoped that I would forget 
you; utterly, completely, irretrieuably forget you, all of you, your voice, your walk, your eyes. 
I was so terribly hurt, Mina, when I found out, so terribly hurt because I had loved you and 
trusted you so much. That this could have happened never occurred to me, during those days 
when we had just been married, and I adored you with all my soul and all my being. You 
never knew, of course, what it was. You never even had a chance to wonder. Now, my 
Mina, you shall know. You shall know everything. 

You were ill that night; you had been strangely weak the month before, and I had been 
strangely weak the month before, and I had been childishly worried over you; bringing you 
things from the drug store, begging you to see the doctor, phoning home in the mornings to 
find out how you were. It was summer time; a warm, thick twilight, the kind you loved so 
much; and a summer storm was being born in a great dark range of clouds off to the south- 
west. I felt your forehead, and brought you two aspirins and a glass of water, and you laid 
them on the chair by the couch, and told me you were going to take them after I had gone 
I promised you I would be back by ten, and thenn I went out, leaving you alone in the still 
house, closing the door carefully behind me, and started out to town. 

I suppose I should have told you I was going with Beatrice Still, it would probably have 
done little good, for you trusted her as fully as I did. You would have been glad for me to 
leave for a while, and follow your constant advice to enjoy myself a little. 

The storm came before we reached the club. Beatrice was a picture that night; in some- 
thing long and silvery, with tiny jewels set in the cloth. Her hair was swept back in that strange 
half-wild manner that you always said would have made any other woman look asinine but 
was becoming to her. We must have chatted amiably for an hour over our liquor before she 
said that first, strange, terrible sentence; that sentence that started my life to its ruin. 

The lightening was flashing through the windows, great blazes that lit up the rain-swept 
countryside for miles. Beatrice had lighted a cigarette, and, in that graceful way of hers, she 
leaned back in her chair and said, "How's Mina tonight, Paul?" 

It was the first time we'd mentioney your name, and I fancy my face lit up as I answered 
her. 

"She's sick again," I said, pouring more champagne. 

"In bed?" she asked quietly. 

"No," I told her, "She was up all morning. It's been just this afternoon she felt worse. 
I left her on the couch asleep." 

"Frankly, Paul, how long will it be?" 
"How long, until what?" 

She smiled. "The baby." 

"The baby?" I asked her. 

"Of course, Paul. You must know by now." 

"But Beatrice," I said, "you know what the doctor said . . . about my never being able to 

become a father . . ." 



There was a sudden pained expression in her eyes, as if she now wished she hadn't brought 
up the subject 

"Why Paul, I ... I imagined you knew." 

"Yes, yes, go on ." 

"I . . . Paul ... I wouldn't have said anything. I thought surely that you knew . . ." 

"But there can't be a baby. I just said . . ." 

Her face gathered determination. "Paul, if you don't know, then it's my duty to tell 



you. 



In God's name, Beatrice 1 Tell we what? What are you driving at ? 
Paul, Mina's not been exactly faithful." 
I don't follow you." 



Yes you do, Paul." 

'Not faithful ... to me 
of some other man's child." 



you mean Mina is 



about to become the mother 



There was o long, stunned, terrible silence. I heard Beatrice saying, "Surely she must 
know. It wouldn't be long before you found out She told me ..." 

I must have stopped breathing. Finally she said, "I'm terribly sorry about it, Paul. 
Terribly sorry. I think . . . you'd better come home now " 

I have no idea whether I answered her or not. I only remember after a while I was in 
the car, and she was driving me home over the drenched road. 

It was then that I began to hate you, Mina. Like some strange, awful thing. It began 
in the toes and came up into the feet and the legs and the stomach and the heart, choking and 
blinding and smothering. All my love, all my devotion, all my adoring tenderness swept 
away in the fierce flame of that hate. At first it was like a storm of fury. Then it became 
deeper than that ... a monstrous thing of silent and bitter determination. As we drove along, 
one course of action became clearer and clearer in my mind; a course of action which would 
avenge me; a course of action that would prevent all scandal — a course of action that not even 
my wildest nightmares would have conceived, and yet that on that terrible night took possession 
of my very body and soul. 

It was a long, silent ride. Neither Beatrice nor myself spoke. I was planning, coldly, 
carefully planning, rehearsing in my mind every movement of the coming hour. When the 
fury of the hate was only beginning within me, I had thought to confront you with my know- 
ledge before killing you, but then some subtler, more sinister council prevailed, and I decided 
that you should never know . . . that you should not have a chance to leave any clue that I 
was your murderer. 

You noticed that I was different when I entered the house. You commented on it, and 
I said I was tired and cross. In your gentile way, you babied me, told me not to forget my 
pajamas, and to open the windows in my room The storm was over, and I remember vour 
saying how much fresher the air was 

"Do you feel better, Mina," I asked you, bending over the couch. 

"I'm afraid not," you said wearily, looking up with that sweet, disarming smile I once 
loved so much. "You mustn't be alarmed if I'm not up and around the next few days. I saw 
the doctor a few days ago " 



"Oh And what did he tell you, "I asked cooly 

"It's nothing much," you said, looking off through the darkness. "It's really very little " 
I stood there by the couch, detesting you with every fibre of my being, cursing you thot /on 
whom I had so loved and trusted, could tell this hateful, slinking lie I found myself breoth- 
ing hard and fast, and clutching the little bottle I had brought up with me from the gardeners 
supply case in the garage 

You were surprised when I came back; you must have thought I had gone to bed 
brought you some tea," I said, setting the cup down by the couch "You looked as if you needed 
something hot." 

"Thanks," you said, "but I really don't care for it You probably need it more than I 

"No," I told you," I made it just for you I insist you drink it 

"Oh," you said," with a laugh of distaste tempered with humor, "you made it too sweet, 
dear Far too sweet. It's almost syrupy . . ." 

I took the cup and went back out into the kitchen. When I came back, you were yawning, 
and said you were too tired to go up to bed, but had decided to sleep there on the couch. I 
covered you with a blanket, and kissed you goodnight, and left you alone in the darkness 

I shall never know, Mina, why I did it. Something in my mind must have snapped under 
the strain of what Beatrice said at the club. I should, of course, have sought another 
source of information, some sort of confirmation of what she said, but I trusted Beatrice as 
blindly, as completely, as I trusted you. Why, as I look back on it now, I should have ever let 
mvself prefer her word to my faith in you, I cannot understand I did not understand it that 
night, nor in the weeks that followed. 

They were horrible, those weeks. I was never afraid of being apprehended for your mur- 
der, for the only police investigator of your death was old Marshall Roberts, who also served as 
coroner. When I explained the cause for your suicide, he was childishly glad to help me keep 
it secret, and returned a verdict of death for self-administered poison, closing forever the of- 
ficial case of your passing. My office staff was very kind; Bill Corbett sent a beautiful spray 
of your favorite red dahlias to the funeral, and followed them with a smaller bouquet every 
Saturday for a month afterward. The neighbors practically fed me on pies and cakes and 
chicken that "just happened to be left over." They made it harder, Mina, with their swirling 
through the house, making me comfortable and '"ympathizing with me, when all I wanted was 
to be alone with the things which were yours and the memories of the days when I could still 
love you and resDect you. I missed you bitterly, terribly, with an empty ache that never went 
away, but lurked continually around the corners of my mind, always spring out again when 
s'eep or business had brought a brief pre-occupation to my mind As your funeral faded and 
farther back into the weeks, it became almost unreal to me, until I began to half expect to meet 
you on the stairs coming down to breakfast, to hear your voice calling my name as I locked 
the garage in the basement at night. The house was empty, utterly, hopelessly empty; there 
was never a moment when I was not feeling your absence, even when swarms of visitors came 
in and filled it with their chatter 

Beatrice was wonderfully kind during those days . . she came every evening, seeing I had 
enough to eat, taking care of my business those first weeks when I was too broken to work, 
urging me out to a movie one night three months after your death 

I cannot say, looking back on it now, when I first came to know that I loved Beatrice 
Perhaps I always loved her. I rather imagine you could say that better than either she or I 
Anyway, Mina, we were married a month ago, in that little church around the corner, the one 
with the ivy grown over the front and the roly-poly minister you always said looked like Smilev 
or what-ever-his-name-was in the Seven Dwarfs. It was a quiet wedding, Beatrice, without 



saying it, agreed with my inner desire to keep my name from any more attention in the papers. 
She work a simple green dress, a hat with brass buttons on one side, and she stood serene and 
lovely through the short service. I brought her here afterward, us and a few friends, and I 
carried her in over the threshhold as I had once carried you in. We had a little wedding 
party, with quiet laughter, while you seemed every minute to be lurking at my elbow, ready to 
speak or to laugh with me. 

It was only this afternoon, Mina, that I found your letter. I had never found the courage 
to go into your room and put it in order, and finally, I told myself, if Beatrice was to live here, 
and stand as my wife in your place, then I must shut you into the past forever, and make you 
live only in one tiny section of my mind. Up in your room, sitting on the chinz covered bench 
you made, I went through your dresser drawers one by one, and there, in the bottom of your 
writing box, I found it. 

Oh, Mina, it was so funny; so cruelly, ironically funny, as I look back on it now. I sat 
there, reading through it with the speed and yet the tenderness which I have always had when 
handling your things since you died, and then I found my eyes suddenly going back to the 
heading of the short paragraph . . . 

Dearest Paul . . . Beatrice has told me, dear, what the doctor has told you. Knowing that 
I, too, am of numbered days, it is my hope that you may go first, so that you will never even 
know that I am ill. It is only in the event that my disease becomes rapidly worse, and that I 
pass away before you, that I shall leave this letter explaining why I never told you. I cannot 
bear to hurt you, and since, as Beatrice tells me, you have only six months, while I may have a 
year, I see no reason why I should. Only remember, dearest, that if I am gone when you read 
this, we shall soon be together again . . ." 

I will never know how I got to the doctor's. He was busy when I entered his office, and it 
was several minutes before I could see him. 

"Brown," I said quickly, "I want to know all about Mina." 

He seemed a little surprised. "Well, Paul . . ." 

"What did she have? It's terribly important that I know, from you . . ." 

"I wasn't surprised when she took her life. I think she did it as much to save you the 
pain of seeing her suffer as to save herself. Your wife had incurable cancer, Paul . . ." 

There in his office, Mina, I saw suddenly, as in a flash of light, the who'e sordid story. How 
you, facing death, had lied to me in your old gentle desire to protect me, to keep me from 
worrying about you; how you had planned to go alone to keep me haooy during what you 
thought were to be the last days of my life. How you must, in those terrible days, have wanted 
to confide everything in me, so that we might tace nemisis together, in each other's arms, pro- 
tecting each other as the shadows came up around us. I saw all in one instant how you had, 
in all the love for me which was yours, sacrificed yourself, how we had been apart. And I 
saw just as suddenly who had kept us apart. 

Beatrice and I, Mina, have had tea together. It is summer and twilight . . . that beautiful 
time of day the French call the "blue hour," that faded afterglow of the sun that you loved so 
well. Yes, sitting out on the little portice, we have had tea together. You were right, Mina 
, . . I do make it too sweet . . . much too sweet. 

Your loving husband, 
Paul. 



ENTHRALLED BY THE GLAMOUR OF THOSE EXTRA-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES WHICH 
ARE, BY TRADITION, THE BETTER THREE-FOURTHS OF COLLEGE LIFE, WE SELL AWAY 
OUR SOULS— WELL, ALMOST— TO THE MANY ORGANIZATIONS OPEN TO US 














If a picture is 5 5-16 x 7 6-8, how much does it have to be 
trimmed to be shrunk to 3 1-2x4? How many rolls of film 
will we have to buy to make 3,758 pictures? How many 10 pt. 
metrolite words will go in one square inch of space?. We didn't 
know then, nor do we yet, but enlisting a staff of efficient 
workers, we closed our eyes, crossed our fingers, and armed 
with a pica ruler and a razor blade, we began. 

We put Betty Jo to making senior and faculty appointments — a 
difficult assignment-, and carried out with not a flaw.. .Helen 
Pulver, Teany, Betty Jean, and Leonore battled with other ap- 
pointments. Mr. Welsh, Miss Crabb, or Dean Walters always 
managed to have their cameras ready for action at a moment's 
notice, and to them we owe our sincerest thanks.. .Uncle Ru 
saved the day by dashing over from Richmond to sling those 
club pics thru the line.. All the while such people as Gretka, 
Schell, Graham, Hibbard, Libby Fearing, and Eleanor Knotts 
were struggling in their end of the deal. Gret spent hours de- 
ciding between one, two, or more lines for the cover — we never 
knew that one straight mark could cause so much disturbance. 




Sc.Hell gave out copy assignments to writers Arnette, Whitt, 
Adler, Jennings, and Lambert. Then the contests began! 
Ruth clamored for literary selections; Eleanor, for snaps, and 
poor Libby pleaded that the seniors come forth with their bi- 
ographies. 

Evelyn and Margaret Ann went right to work selling a book still 
in the scrap card stage as confidently as if it were already at the 
printers. Then when Sloan, Christine, Ozella, and Mary Helen 
started collecting money in the pay up lines, we knew we had to 
produce. So rounding up Slush and Bobbie to mount pictures, 
Virginia Godbey, Flossie and "Gertie," and Margaret Duncan 
for typing, we struggled over to the Chimes Office and worked 
with a clock on one side and a time table on the other — telling 
us when that "last chance" train to the engravers would leave. 
Somehow our clock was always slow. 

From the first Muss and Jo kept the letters going out and the 
money miraculously coming in. And there were Deans Smith, 
Weidler, Walters, and Mr. Kavanaugh to keep us in line. 

Through it all we've had fun. We've had time for Alta's hot 
dogs at midnight, for engagements, and "soap operas" over 
Dean Shutt's radio. And to every person who gave as much as 
one hour towards the building of the '46 CHIMES we owe our 
thanks. 




» 








<Mt 






SIGMA PI SIGMA 

Dr. Noll, Mr. V. D. Roberts, 
B r i g i t t e Auerbach, Sam 
Hurst, Mr. Pugsley. 



RESERVED FOR PEOPLE WHO CAN SEE THROUGH PHYSICS PI GAMMA MU FOR 

SOCIAL SCIENTISTS PI ALPHA FOR GAZERS INTO TEST TUBES . . . 



PI GAMMA MU 

Bock — Mr. Chidester, Mr. 
Hardin, Mr. Hatcher. 
Middle — Dean Weidler, 
Mrs. Steinberger, Helen 
Furhman, Mrs. Weidler, Dr. 
Crippen. 

Front — Irene Pigman, Alta 
Whitt, Aileen Lewis, Dor- 
othy Tredennick. 



PI ALPHA 

Virginia Henderson, Evalee 
Williams, Dr. Bangson, Mary 
Elizabeth Jones, Marie Lay, 
Nina Clark, Jean Harris, 
Amanda Estepp, Pat Mor- 
ton, Anna Wills, Brigitte 
Auerbach, Ken Smith, Ova- 
line Beck, Frances Barkley, 
Helen Pulver, Bobbie Hill- 
man, Lois Haun, Christine 
La Fon. 





TAU KAPPA ALPHA 

1st Row — Irene Pigmon, 
Marian Nausau, Nancy 
King, Helen Fuhrman, Kay 
Abels. 

2nd Row — Dean Weidler, 
Evelyn Hibbard, Aileen 
Lewis, Willard Arnett. 
3rd Row — Dr. Sorrier, Dr. 
Hardin, Dean Shutt. 



TAU KAPPA ALPHA, WHERE TALKING BECOMES AN HONOR . . . THERE ARE SELDOM 
TWENTY WRITERS, BUT THEY MAKE UP FOR QUANTITY WITH QUALITY . . BIRD 
CLUB, A HOBBY WITH A FANCY NAME, BUT THEY STAY DOWN TO EARTH 




TWENTY WRITERS 

Seated — Emmy Voden, 
Scharlene Oney, Eileen 
Hartley, Doris Adler, Fran- 
ces Bradshaw, Dorothy 
Tredennick, Ruth Steinberg, 
Dean Lambert. 
Standing — Dr. Weekes, 
W i II a r d Arnett, Jerry 
Crouch, Dr. Wager. 



BIRD CLUB 

1st Row — Lois Haun, Miss 
Crab. 

2nd Row — Evalee Williams, 
Miss Durst, Amanda Estepp, 
Ovaline Beck, Mary Ellen 
Ayers, Mabel Boehm, Sher- 
idan Hall. 

3rd Row — Pat Morton, 
Marie Lay, Dr. Bangson, 
Jack Buchanan, Truman 
Denham, 




LOWER DIVISION SENATE 

1st Row — Emmy Vode*., 
Leonore Noll, Betty Jean 
Morgan, Barbara Goddard, 
Pat Justice, Dorothea Noss. 
2nd Row — Dr. Sattler, 
Marvette Davis, Jim Bishop, 
Linzee Packard, Earle Fish, 
Dean Shutt. 

3rd Row — Logan Collins, Mr. 
Hughes, John Coapman. 



MAKING STUDENT GOVERNMENT WORK . . WHATE'ER THE PROBLEMS ARE, THEY MAKE 
A STAB AT THEM U.D. or L.D. IT'S AN HONOR, AND A RESPONSIBILITY, TO SERVE . . 



UPPER DIVISION WOMEN'S 

COUNCIL 

Dean Allen, Billie Rominger, 
Jo Richards, Zenobia Hope, 
Dorothy Tredennick, Helen 
Pulver, Madge Sparks, Eliz- 
abeth Fearing, Irene Pig- 
man, Miss Macaulay. 




UPPER DIVISION STUDENT 

COUNCIL 

Jack Buchanan, Hughes 
Spurlock, Kendric Smith, 
James O'Dell, Dr. Bangson, 
Bill Norton, Ormand Wil- 
Mams, Frances Finnell, 
Gretka Young, Elizabeth 
Fearing, Miss Ludlum, Mar- 
garet Ann Graham, Mary 
- Ellen Ayer; Ruth Slusher, 
Miss Allen, Joan Rowe, 
Dorothy Tredennick. 




WAA BOARD 

Seated — Barbara Goddard, 
Ruth Ferrill, Irene Pigman, 
Alice Russell, Mary Helen 
Adkins, June Settle. 
Standing — Doris Neal, 
Theda Taylor, Helen Hard 
esty, Helen Nicholas, Jua- 
nita Noland, Mary Ellen 
Ayer. 




THE WAA, OUR ENERGETIC FRIENDS WHO TREK FROM VOLLEY BALL TO TENNIS TO 
SWIMMING THE EDUCATION CLUB— SPREADING THE LIGHT TO THE MOUNTAINS, 

AND ELSEWHERE TOO . . . LIFE SERVICE— A PAUSE FOR RELIGIOUS EMPHASIS 




EDUCATION CLUB 

Sue O'Daniel, Mr. Chidester, 
Evalee Williams, Marie Lay, 
Dorothy Wheeler, Olga 
Smith, Virginia Sanders, 
June Lane, Kathleen Brown- 
ing, Pat Morton, Joyce 
Hardin. 



LIFE SERVICE 

Standing — Frank Edwards, 
James O'Dell, Reuben Hunt- 
er, Leonard Oxier, Doris 
Swingle, Alice Franklin, 
Anna Johnson. 
Sitting — Mary Frances Sha- 
fer, Alberta Thomas, Pat 
Fenn, Anna Claire, Florence 
Baker, Helen Webb. 

Floor — Katherine French, 
Naomi Eppard, Elsie Coffey, 
Mildred Green. 




SOCIOLOGY CLUB 

Marian Nassau, Carol Ann 
Coapman, Dove Altizer, 
Marjorie Murphy, William 
K i m s e y , Dorothy Ison, 
J'mrtiEC Ruth Burton, Mary 
Stanley, Ruth Ferrill, Faye 
P e n I e y , Nancy McGuire, 
Doris Neal, Mabel Boehm. 



MORE WORK IN GETTING PEOPLE TO LIVE TOGETHER . . . THE Y'S ARE ALWAYS GOING 
STRONG, MEN'S AND WOMEN'S . . . OPENING ROADS OF FELLOWSHIP AND SERVICE 
TOGETHER . . . LEADERS AND MEMBERS, IT'S A GREAT OPPORTUNITY . . . 



YMCA CABINET 

1st Row — Reuben Hunter, 

Ormand Williams, Jimmy 

Hines. 

2nd Row — Frank Edwards, 

Gene Burton, Garland 

Thayer. 

3rd Row — Tom Finney, Paul 

Thayer, Bill Norton. 




COUNTRY DANCERS 

Genevieve Graham, Nancy 
King, Billie Sue Davis, Ro- 
berta Halcomb, Betty Love- 
lace, Mary Ellen Ayer, 
Christine LaFon, Mary Helen 
Adkins, Ruth Shuler, Mabel 
Boehm, James Bishop, Ed- 
ward Cox, Foster Burgess, 
Gene Burton, Frank Smith, 
Badgette Dillard, James 
Dowdy, Harold Reynolds, 
Donval Simpson. 




AT COUNTRY DANCERS ARE KEPT ALIVE THE TRANSITIONAL DANCES OF OUR FATHERS 
FOR GENERATIONS BEFORE US. 




YWCA CABINET 

Standing — Harriet Hoff- 
man, Evelyn Hibbard, Helen 
Pulver, Theda Taylor, Aline 
Woodwin, Marian Nassau, 
Julia P. Thomas, Pat Wil- 
liams, Mary Stanley, Anna 
Wills, Dorothy Medich, 
Anna Johnson. 
Sitting — Eleanor Zipf, John 
R o w e , L i I I i e Margaret 
Prcssley, Billie Sue Davis, 
Virginia Henderson, Miss 
Hunter. 




We're the background people — we build the set the 
actors prattle on — whatever's wanted — light or dark, 
gay or grim, we can build it, or at least we'll try . . . 
Hammer and nails, paint and brushes — flats to set up 
and wires to nail down — We provide moons and birds, 
songs, and burn orphanages . . . 

Ruth Schell, Joyce Hardin, Tharon Musser 







Alpha Psi Omega — It was worth 
it — even the performance in 
front of Boone Tavern — another 
laurel, but no time to rest — 
Plenty is expected of a member 
of a National Dramatics Fratern- 
ity. High standards must be 
maintained . . , We've got to 
stay worthy of the honor, you 
know . . . 

Tharon Musser, Ruth Schell, 
Joyce Hardin, Doris Adler, Hilda 
Lane. 




Thespians — on stage or off, we 
keep the ideal of the actor before 
us. We may never make Broad- 
way, but it's fun to try. Lines to 
learn and mistakes to remember, 
and correct — From try-outs to 
curtain time, it's work and lots 
of it — but we wouldn't miss it for 
the world. 

Leonore Noll, Beverley Taylor, 
Joyce Pennington, George Filmore 



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'EMBERSHIP ONLY 




"BUT YOU REALLY MUSTN'T BRING VISITORS TO A 'MEMBERSHIP ONLY' MEETING— 
ITT THE COPYRIGHT RESTRICTIONS—" MEMBERSHIP AT 300— IT'S BEEN A BANG- 
UP YEAR— 



THE TABERNACLE NEWS | 

I.'.. .:.. Jjmui 12. Mo 



." 



■ 



GHOST 



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HWtkRWft BEHINb 
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SHOES AND COSTUMES AND STUFF— MAJOR SHOW TRYOUT'S NEXT WEEK — KEEP 
WORKING. "THERE ARE NO SMALL PARTS— THERE ARE ONLY SMALL ACTORS . . ." 
STANISLAVSKY 






VANGUARDS 

Back Row — J. Clayton 

F e a v e r , Oscar Davidson, 

Marvette Davis, Donald 

Claypool. 

Middle Row — Joyce Hardin, 

Mary Golden Saferight, 

Martha Daniels, Emma 

Voden, Lola Sholer, Roberta 

Messer, Bill Parks, Bill 

Collawn. 

Front Row — Nancy King, 

B r i g i 1 1 e Auerbach, Jean 

Burnette, Barbara Goddard, 

Jo Richards, Kay Abels, Dr. 

Ross. 



LOOKING INTO THE FUTURE . . . COUNTING BRIDGES BEFORE WE COME TO THEM . . . 
KEEPING THE CAMPUS INFORMED . . . COSMOPOLITANS . . . THERE ARE MANY FLAGS IN 
MANY LANDS . . . 



WALLPAPER STAFF 

Standing — Jean Harris, Bill 
Collawn, Clinton Ramey, 
Irene Pigman, Jimmy Hines, 
Helen Davis, Jean Burnette, 
M a r j o r i e Murphy, Polly 
Brooks, Roberto Casablanca, 
Helen O . Smith, Ruth 
Burnette, Ruth Slover, Ra- 
mona Layne, Martha Hutch- 
erson. Dean Lambert, Alta 
Whitt, Elizabeth Boughton, 
Sitting — Eleanor Cipolla, 
Toby Woolums, Ruth Boggs, 
Emma Voden, Betty Ann 
Hixon. 

COSMOPOLITANS 

Standing — Mary Abodeely, 
Harriet Hoffman, Marian 
Nassau, Dorothy Palmer, 
Geneva Matlock, Carol 
Coapman, Ruth Steinberg, 
John Coapman, Amalio 
Rubio, Jose Rubio, Mario 
Ossorio. 

Sitting (Couch) — Lourdes 
Ossorio, Emma Voden, Dor- 
othy Medich, Linzee Pack- 
ard, Helen Pulver, Brigitte 
Auerbach, Roberto Casa- 
blanca. 

Sitting (Floor) — Rose 
Adacho, Mary Stylos. 




PAN AMERICAN LEAGUE 

Standing — Dorothy Wheel- 
er, Amalio Rubic, Alta 
Whitt, Mario Ossorio. 
Sitting — Lorraine Sayler, 
Marvette Davis, Rosemary 
Wetsel, Roberto Casablanca, 
Emogene Money, Jose Rubio. 




REACHING HANDS SOUTH OF THE BORDER . . . DISCUSSING WORLD PROBLEMS, AND 
ONES NEARER AT HOME, TOO . . . PARLEZ VOUS FRANCIAS? 




PUBLIC AFFAIRS FORUM 

1st Row — Dr. Peck, Jean 
Burnette, Rosemary Wetzel, 
Emogene Money, Ruth 
Steinberg, Elinor Zipf, Em- 
ma Voden, Mary Ellen 
Ayer, Rosebelle Elkins, Lor- 
raine Salyer, Mabel Boehm, 
Alta Whitt. 

2nd Row — Dorothy Treden- 
nick, Brigitte Auerbach, 
Mory Elizabeth Jones, 
Marvette Davis, Amalio 
Rubio. 

3rd Row — Faye Ritchie, Fay 
Penley, Helen Pulver. 
4th Row — Phyllis Daniels, 
Mary Saferight, Oscar 
Davidson, Ken Smith, Glenn 
Harris, Jose Rubio, Roberto 
Casablanca, Mario Ossorio. 



FRENCH CLUB 

1st Row — Dorothy Palmer, 

Helen Barnes. 

2nd Row — Miss Richardson, 

Harriet Hoffman, Miss Led- 

ford, Gretka Young, Alice 

Russel, Miss Chapin. 

3rd Row — Bill Ledford, 

Mary A b o d e e I y , James 

O'Dell, Harry Dodd, Mary 

Helen Adkins, John Benson. 



MUSIC 
BEST . 



BAND 

1st Row — Margaret Duncan, 
Peggy Refo, Fred Chapman, 
Alma Stevenson, Margaret 
Blizzard, A. T. Wiggins, 
Ken Smith. 

2nd Row — Reggie Walton, 
Pauline Whitaker, Hal 
Tollison, Dean Lambert, 
Betty Lou Roache, Margaret 
Davis, Charline Whitaker, 
Bill Sicker, Wyldine Wil- 
liams, Frances Bradshaw, 
Jack Perciful. 

3rd Row — Helen Hardesty, 
Peggy Hicks, Irene Pigman, 
Joanne Warriner, Bobby 
Johnston, Bill Blessing, Joan 
Bridges, Ramona Layne, 
Rissie Faye Layne, Louis 
Rogers, John Bradbury, 
Paul Leach. 

WHETHER IT'S A VICTORY PARADE OR A COMMENCEMENT, WE GET THE 

THE SOFTER HARMONY OF BLENDED VOICES . . . 




STUDIO ENSEMBLE 

Mrs. Mulligan, Anne Hayes, 
Marian Davis, Pat Dawson, 
Hazel Ann Dawson, Jean 
Hayes, Jimmy Malonee, 
Jane Bishop, Sarah Wil- 
liams. 



MEN'S GLEE CLUB 

1st Row — Reuben Hunter, 
Miguel Tamayo, Lilburn 
Goode, Mr. Warner, Earl 
Woods, Bill Eicker, Jim 
Bishop, Max Hesselgesser, 
Sam Scruggs. 

2nd Row — Al Demaree, 
Ingivi, Bill Collawn, Charlie 
Keyser, Linzee Packard, 
Jim Dowdy, Louis Rogers, 
Fred Chapman. 
3rd Row — Harold Reynolds, 
Jack Buchanan, Herschel 
McDaniel, Frank Edwards. 





THE GLORY OF A GREAT CHORUS . . . TWO PERFORMANCES A YEAR, NOW, TOO 
"VIENNA WOODS" AND HUNGARIAN DANCE NO 5" 




ORCHESTRA 




Eleanor Knotts, Betty Lou 
Powers, Mrs. Peck, Mary 
Lou Keener, Mrs. Wright, 
Phyllis Daniels, Reginald 
Walton, Margaret Duncan, 
Peggy Refo, Marjorie Keen- 
er, Reuben Hunter, A. T. 
Wiggins, Jack Perciful, Jo 
Ann Gouge, Delores Noll, 
John Biggerstaff, Kathleen 
Jett. 



VASITY WOMEN'S 
GLEE CLUB 

Bob Crosswhite, Miss Kysela, 
Marjorie Keener, Jimmie 
Burton, Dorothea Noss, Jan 
Van Scoyck, Maggie Puck- 
ett, Kathleen Jett, Betty 
I m r i e , Frances Finnell, 
Eleanor Knotts, Phyllis 
Daniels, Martha Williams, 
Jeanne Hardy, Lucille 
Crumpler, Margaret Ann 
Graham, Ida Mae Hogshead, 
Dorothy Amey, Virginia 
Morris. 




PADEREWSKI'S MINUET— THE LIGHT FANTASTIC FOR THE QUEEN OF MAY . . . THE 
FIRE DEPARTMENT TAKES A LOT OF RIBBING, BUT IT DOES A LOT OF GOOD . . NEW 
TRUCK THIS YEAR, TOO AND CHIEF'S RETIRED 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

1st Row — Reedus Back, 

Herschel McDaniels, Oscar 

Davidson. 

2nd Row — Jack Hale, Tom 

Finney, James Bayes, 

"Chief", Jim Taylor, Frank 

Sero. 



AG UNION 

1st Row — James Bays, Harry 
Bailey, Larry Wolfe, Alton 
Noblett, James Wing, Alden 
Noblett, Russell Hennessee. 
2nd Row — Frederick Kirsch, 
Bill Norton, Ormand Wil- 
liams, Edwin Bishop, Hughes 
Spurlock, Ray Feltner, Sam 
McNeil. 

3rd Row — Gene Bollinger, 
Mr. Spillman, Wilbur Kin 
caid, Mr. Monier, Reedus 
Back, Jack Buchanan, Mr. 
Wolford. 




AG UNION SOCIALS HAVE 
MADE IT FAMOUS . . . HOME 
EC AIMS TO TEACH THE WAY 
TO A MAN'S HEART ... IN THE 
CITY OR THE COUNTRY . . . 








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HOME EC CLUB 

1st Row — Lucille Davis, 
Pauline Sloane, Madge 
Sharks, Roberta Halcombe, 
Kathleen Roberts, Anna 
Claire, Christine La Fon, 
Connie Roberts. 
2nd Row — Florence Begley, 
Ruby Sasser, Norma York, 
Virginia Godbey, Aline 
Goodwin, Geraldine Lucas, 
Virginia Balden, Geneva 
Matlock, Opalee, Smith, 
Rena Yount, Ruby Fleming, 
Ozella Hurst, Florence Elam. 



AG-HOME EC CLUB 

Florence Begley, Ormand 
Williams, Hughes Spurlock, 
Lucy Goins, Bill Norton, 
Helen Forloine, Edwin 
Bishop, Jack Buchanan, Pat 
Williams, Kathleen Roberts, 
Pauline Sloane, Virginia 
Balden, Claribel Buchanan, 
Alda Ruth Morris, Norman 
York, Florence Elam, Lucille 
Davis, Marion Branum, 
Ruby Fleming, Rena Yount, 
Geraldine Lucas, Opalee 
Smith, Aline Goodwin, Billa 
Jean Peters, Fannie Wilder, 
Madge Sparks. 




ALUMNI— Clark, H., B., Parsons, Green, Wright, G., Kirby. 
Kilbourne, Wilson, Moore, Hale, Wright, T. 



VARSITY — Kilbourne, Lovell, Hale, Welsh, Robbins, Allen, Reynolds. 

Woods, Ramey, Lang, Poteat, Compton, Lewis, Edwards, Henderson. 





ACADEMY — Coach Henderson, Miller, Hangar, Huff, Morgan, Fish, Bradbury, R. 
Bradbury, J., Holmes, Spillman, Hilton, Rue, Gentry. 
Johnson, Coyle, Clarkston, Rose. 



FOUNDATION — Fish, Walters, Card, Blackburn, Smith, Vanderpool, Grahar 
Schumacher, Johnson, Bales, Coyle, Barker, Center, Hymer. 




'"> ' * 



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J V 

• — HP 




BIOGRAPHIES, UD SENIORS 



ADKINS, MARY HELEN— Bereo Players 1,3; 
YWCA 1, French Club 2,3,4; WAA 2,3,4, 
Board 3,4, Treas. 4; Country Dancers 3,4; 
Harmonia 2, Chimes Staff 4, 

ALTIZER, EVA DOVE— Berea Players 1; Soci- 
ology Club 3,4; YWCA 1,2,3,4, Outlying 
Work 2,3,4; WAA 1,2. 

AUERBACH, BRIGITTE — Vanguards 3,4, Coun 
cil 4; PAF 1,2,3,4; Berea Players 1,4; Life 
Saving 2; Pi Alpha 3,4; Sigma Pi Sigma 
3,4, Sec. 4; Cosmopolitan Club 4, YWCA 
4. 

BALDEN, VIRGINIA— Berea Players 4; Home 
Ec Club 3,4; Ag-Home Ec Club 4; YWCA 
1,2. 

BECK, CORA OVALINE— YWCA 1,2,3,4, Har 
monia 1,4; Bird Club 2,3,4; Pi Alpha 3,4. 

BEGLEY, FLORENCE— Berea Players 1 ; YWCA 
1; Home Ec. Club 4; Ag-Home Ec. Club 4. 

BOEHM, MABEL— LD Senate 1, Sec. 1, Bird 
Club 3,4, Publicity Chairman 3, Union 
Church Choir 4; Project Committee 1 ; 
Country Dancers 1 ,2,3,4; Sec. 2, Pres. 4, 
Sociology Club 3,4; Pi Gamma Mu 3,4; 
PAF 4; Harmonia 1 ; YWCA 4. 

BRANUM, MARION— Berea Players 1,2,3; 
YWCA 1,2,3; Home Ec. Club 3,4; Har- 
monia 4; Ag-Home Ec. Club 4. 

BUCHANAN, JACK W— Ag Club 3,4; Vice- 
Pres. 4; Ag-Home Ec Club 4; YMCA 2,4, 
Alpha Zeta 1; Band 1,2; Orchestra 1,2,3; 
Harmonia 2,3; LD Glee Club 1 , Varsity 
Men's Glee Club 2,4; AF 3,4, Pres. 4; 
Class Vice-Pres. 2; Class Pres. 4; UD Board 
of Governors, Vice-Pres. 3; UD Student 
Council 4, Pres. 4; Bird Club 3,4, Treas. 3, 
Berea Players 2; WHO'S WHO IN AMER- 
ICAN UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES. 

BURTON, JIMMIE RUTH— Transfer Southern 
Union Church Choir 3; Varsity Women's 
Glee Club 4; YWCA 3,4, Cabinet 4; Soci- 
ology Club 3,4, Vice-Pres. 4; Harmonia 
3,4. 

CARTER, HILDA — Transfer Brevard College, 
North Carolina; YWCA 4. 



CLARK, BERN ICE— Berea Players 1,2,3,4; Class 
Sec. 1; YWCA 1,2 

COTTON, JAN— PAF 1; Berea Players 2,3, 
Harmonia 3,4; Band 1 . 

CROSSWHITE, BOBBY COYLE— Accompanist, 
Varsity Women's Glee Club 1 ,2,3,4; YWCA 
I. 

DAVIS, HELEN MURIEL— YWCA 1,2, Berea 
Players 3,4; Wallpaper Staff 4. 

DAVIS, LILLIAN— Berea Players 3,4; YWCA 1, 
PAF 4. 

DAVIS, LUCILLE— YWCA 1, PAF 2; Ag-Home 
Ec. Club 4; Home Ec. Club 3,4, Pres. 4; 
Berea Players 3,4; Recreation Committee 
4. 

DOCTOR, MARTIN — Transfer University of 
Illinois; Berea Players 4. 

DUNCAN, MARGARET ELIZABETH — Berea 
Players 2,3,4; Harmonia 1,3,4. YWCA 1,2; 
Orchestra 1,2,4; Band 1,2,4 Chimes Staff 
4. 

EDWARDS, FRANK— YMCA 1,2,3,4, Pres. 3; 
Life Service 2,3,4, Pres. 4' LD Senate 2; 
UD Senate 3; UD Student C.uncil 4; Berea 
Players 3; Men's Glee Club 4; Harmonia 
4. 

ELAM, FLORENCE ELAINE— YWCA 1,2; Berea 
Plovers 1,2,3,4, Group Chairman 3; Home 
Ec Club 3,4; Reporter 3: Ag-Home Ec Club 
4, Sec. 4, Reporter 4; Class Sec. 4; Wall- 
paper Staff 4; Harmon-a 4; Kv. Home Ec. 
Assn., Vice-Pres. 3; Ch ; mes Staff 4. 

ELK INS, ROSEBELLE— Berea Plovers 1; French 
Club 1,2, Vice-Pres. 2" YWCA 1; LD Sun- 
day School Council 2; Psychology Club 3; 
UD Chopel Committee 4; PAF 3,4, Council 
4. 

ELLER, ELYNA — Transfer Brevard College, 
North Carolina; YWCA 3,4: Berea Plovers 
3; Harmonia 4. 



ESTEPP, AMANDA JEAN— Transfer Cumber- 
land College, Kentucky; YWCA 3,4; Har- 
monic 4, Pi Alpha 4; Bird Club 4, UD 
Women's Council 3. 

FAIR, RUTH— YWCA 1,2,3,4; Harmonia 3,3; 
Berea Players 2,3. 

FEARING ELIZABETH— Inter Dorm Council 2; 
Berea Players 1,3,4; Chimes Staff 4; YWCA 
1,2,3,4; Education Club 4; UD Student 
Council 4; UD Women's Council 3,4, Sec. 
3. 

FERRIL, RUTH— YWCA 1,2,3,4, Outing Club 
1 , Band 1 ; Berea Players 1 ,2,4, Group 
Chairman 2; PAF 2,3,4; Vanguards 3, 
WAA 1,2,3,4, Council 1,2,3,4, Pres. 3; 
Sociology Club 3,4. 

FORLOINE, HELEN— YWCA 1,2; WAA 1,2; 
Harmonia 2,3,4; Home Ec Club 3,4; Ag- 
Home Ec Club 4. 

GODBEY, VIRGINIA— Berea Players 1; Har- 
monia 1,3,4; YWCA 1,2; Home Ec. Club 
3,4; Ag-Home Ec Club 4; Chimes Staff 4. 

GOINS, LUCY — Transfer Mars Hill College, 
North Carolina, Harmonia 3,4; Ag-Home 
Ec Club, Vice-Pres. 4; Basketball 3,4; 
YWCA 3,4. BSU 3,4; Prayer Group 4; 
Home Ec Club, 4. 

GRAHAM, MARGARET— Berea Players 1,3,4, 
Second Vice-Pres., 3; Varsity Women's 
Glee Club 1,2,3,4, Sec. -Treasurer 4; UD 
Board of Governors 3; UD Student Council 
4, Sec. 4, Danforth Chapel Choir 1,2; 
Psychology Club 3; Chimes Staff, Circula- 
tion Editor 4. 

GREGG, BETTY— Berea Players 1 ,4; YWCA 1 ,2. 

GREGG, POLLY— Vanguards 1,2,3,4, Sec. 3, 
Council 4; PAF 1,2,3, Pan American 
League 1 ,2,3, Treas. 3; Berea Players 1,2,4; 
YWCA 1,3. 

HARDIN, JOYCE— Education Club 4; WAA 
1,2, Vanguards 1,4; YWCA 1,2,3,4, Cab- 
inet 2; Inter-school Social Comm. 1 ,2, Chm. 
2; Berea Players 1,2,3,4, Council 2,3,4, 
Group Chairman 2; Alpha Psi Omega 3,4, 
Vice-Pres. 4, Tau Delta Tau 3,4, Sec- 
Treas. 4, Chimes Staff 3,4, Asst Photo- 
grapher 3, Co-Editor 4 



HARRIS, JEAN — Berea Players 3,4; YWCA 
1,2,3,4; Pi Alpha 3,4; Wallpaper Staff 3,4; 
PAF 1,2; Prayer Group 3,4. 



HARTLEY, LOIS B.— Berea Players, 1,2; 
1,2,3; Pi Alpha 3,4; YWCA 1,2. 



PAF 



HENDERSON, VIRGINIA— Harmonia 1,2,3,4; 
Berea Players 1,4; French Club 2; YWCA 
1,2,3,4, Cabinet 2,3,4; BSU 1,2,3,4, Pres. 
4; Pi Alpha 3,4; PAF 3,4. 

HIBBARD, EVELYN— YWCA 1,2,3,4, Cabinet 
4; UD Women's Council; Berea Players 1 ,4; 
Harmonia 2,3; Danforth Chapel Choir 1; 
Band 2,3,4; Orchestra 4; Chimes, Co-Cir- 
culation Manager 4; Tau Kappa Alpha 
3,4; UD Social Comm. 4; Institutional 
Recreational Comm. 3,4; Class Social 
Comm. Chairman 4. 

HILLMAN, BOBBIE— Berea Players 1,3; Har- 
monia 4; LD Senate 1; UD Board of Gov- 
ernors 3, Treas. 3; Class Treas. 4; Chimes 
Staff 4; Pi Alpha 3,4; Sec. 4. 

HILTON, FRANCES— PAF 1,2,3,4; Berea Play- 
ers 1,2,3,4; Life Saving 2; WAA 2; YWCA 
1,3; Home Ec Club 3,4; Ag-Home Ec Club 
4. 

HOERNLEIN, LENORA— Berea Players 1, Van- 
guards 1 ; Prayer Group 1 . 

HORTON, REBEKAH— Harmonia 1,2,4; Berea 
Players 3; YWCA 1,4; BSU 1,2,3,4, Coun- 
cil 3,4; Life Service 2,3. 

HUNT, ELIZABETH — Harmonia 4; Berea 
Players 1,2,3; YWCA 1,2,3,4. 

HURST, OZELLA YWCA 1,2; Berea Players 
2,3,4; Home Ec Club 3,4, Ag-Home Ec 
Club 4. Chimes Staff 4. 

JETT, KATHLEEN— LD Choir 1,2, YWCA 2, 
Life Saving 3; Varsity Women's Glee Club 
1,2,3,4, Pres. 4; Band 3,4; Orchestra 1,4, 
Harmonia 1,2,3; Berea Players 4. 

JONES, MARY ELIZABETH— YWCA 1,2,3,4, 
PAF 3,4; Pi Alpha 3,4, Treas. 3, Executive 
Council 3, Program Comm. 4; Berea Play- 
ers 1,2,3; Harmonia 3,4; WAA 2,3,4 



KING, NANCY CAROLYN— Country Dancers 
2,3,4; YWCA 2; Berea Players, 2,3,4, 
Parliamentarian 3; Tau Kappa Alpha 
2,3,4; Inter-Dorm Council, Pres. 2; Van- 
guard Council 4, Chimes, Co-Editor 4, 
WHO'S WHO IN AMERICAN UNIVER- 
SITIES AND COLLEGES. 

KIRSCH, FREDERICK WILLIAM - Ag Club 
1,2,3,4, Treas. 2, Pres. 4; Board of Gov- 
ernors 3,4; UD Chapel Comm 4. 

KOFF, ESTHER WERTHEIMER— Transfer Brook- 
lyn College and New York University, N Y .; 
PAF 3,4, Vice-Pres. 4; Vanguards 3,4, 
Publicity Chairman 4; Chapel Program 
Comm. 4. 

LA FON, CHRISTINE— Berea Players 1,2,3,4, 
YWCA 1,2,4; Outing Club 2; Home Ec 
Club 3,4, Treas. 4; Country Dancers 3,4, 
Pi Alpha 3,4, Chimes Staff 4. 

LANE, JUNE— YWCA 2,3,4; Education Club 4, 
Bird Club 3,4. 

LAY, MARIE ELIZABETH— Berea Players 1,2, 
YWCA 1,2,3,4, Harmoma 3,4, Union 
Church Choir 4; Pi Alpha 3,4; Bird Club 
4; Education Club 4. 

LEWIS, AILEEN H.— Wallpaper Staff 1,2,3,4 
YWCA 1,2,3,4, Cabinet 1,2,3, Sec. 3, Ed 
itorial Staff, YW-YM Student Handbook 3 
Berea Players 1,2,3, Business Mgr. 3; Inter 
School Recreation Comm. 2; Class Sec 3 
Tau Kappa Alpha 4, PAF 4 Pi Gamma Mu 
4; Class Project Comm. 4; Inter-Dormitory 
Council 2; WHO'S WHO IN AMERICAN 
UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES. 

LUCAS, GERALDINE— Berea Players 1,2,3,4; 
WAA 1; YWCA 1,2,3,4; Home Ec Club 
3,4; Ag-Home Ec Club 4 

MANEY, EMOGENE— Vanguards 1, YWCA 1, 
Rural Life 2; PAF 2,4; Pan-American 
League 3,4, Vice-Pres. 4. 

MATLOCK, GENEVA METZLER— YWCA 1,2, 
Berea Players 1,2; UD Women's Council 3, 
Class Treas. 3; Home Ec Club 3,4; Cosmo- 
politan Club 4. 



MORRIS, ALDA RUTH — YWCA 1,2; Berea 
Players 1 ,2,4; WAA 2,3,4; Home Ec Club 
3,4; Ag-Home Ec Club 4 



MORTON, PANSY FERN— Union Church Choir 
4, Berea Players 1 ; Harmonia 1 ,2,3,4, 
YWCA 1,2,3,4, Vice Pres 4; Education 
Club 4; Bird Club 3,4 

MUSSER, THARON— YWCA 1,2,3,4, Cabinet 
3; Berea Players 1,2,3,4, Council 2,3,4, 
Hall of Fame 3, Second Vice-Pres. 2; Sec. 
3, Pres. 4, Alpha Psi Omega 3,4; Tau Delta 
Tau 2,3,4, Pres. 3,4, Tau Kappa Alpha 
2,3,4; Chimes Staff 3,4, Bus Mgr. 4; WAA 
1,2,4, Treas. 2, Class Vice-Pres. 4, Inter- 
Dorm Council, Pres. 2; LD Social Comm 
WHO'S WHO IN AMERICAN UNIVER 
SITIES AND COLLEGES. 

NASSAU, MARIAN EVELYN — YWCA 1,2,3,4, 
Cabinet 4; Berea Players 1 ,2,3,4; Sociology 
Club 3,4, Cosmopolitan Club 3,4, Tau 
Kappa Alpha 4, Life Saving 1 , Sunday 
School Council 1 . 

NORTON, WILLIAM I — YMCA 1,2,3,4, Treas. 
3,4, Cabinet 2,3,4, Ag Union 1,2,3,4, 
Pres. 4; Prayer Group 1,2,3,4; UD Senate 
and Board of Governors 3, UD Student 
Council 4, MYF 2,3,4, Vice-Pres. 4. 

O'DELL, JAMES S— YMCA 1,2,3,4; UD Senate 
3; UD Student Council 4, YMCA Cabinet 4, 
French Club 3,4; Life Service 3,4. 

PARRIS, RUBY— Outlying Work 2; YWCA 1,2. 
3,4; Harmonia 3,4 

PETERS, BILLA JEAN — Berea Players 1,3; 
YWCA 1,2,3,4; Home Ec. Club 3,4; Ag- 
Home Ec. Club 4; WAA 1. 

PULVER, HELEN— Berea Players 1,2; Sec. of 
Class 2; YWCA 1,2,3,4, Cosmopolitans 
3,4; Wallpaper 3, Public Affairs Forum 4; 
Pi Alpha 3,4; UD Women's Council 4 
WHO'S WHO IN AMERICAN UNIVER- 
SITIES AND COLLEGES. 

RANKIN, BETTY JO — Berea Players 1,2,3; Har- 
monia 4; Chimes Staff 4; YWCA 1,2,3,4; 
Home Ec Club 3; Chairman Class Project 
Committee 4; Wallpaper staff 3; Chairman 
Class Social Committee3. 

ROBERTS. CONNIE — Transfer Brevard College. 
North Carolina; Home Ec. Club 3,4: Berea 
Players 3; YWCA 3,4; Ag-Home Ec Club 4 
Harmonia 4. 



ROBERTS, KATHLEEN— Berea Players 1,2; 
YWCA 1; Class Project Comm. Chair. 2; 
Home Ec Club 3,4; Ag-Home Ec Club 4, 
Treasurer 4. 

ROMINGER, BILLIE — YWCA 1,2,3, Cabinet 
2,3; Council of UD Women's Assn. 4; Berea 
Players 1,2,3,4. 

SALISBURY, BONNIE RUTH— YWCA 1,2,3,4; 
Berea Players 1,2,3; Life Service 4; PAF 4; 
Vanguards 4. 

SASSER, RUBY — Transfer from Campbellsville 
College, Ky.; Home Ec. Club 3,4; YWCA 
3,4; Harmonia 4; BSU 3,4; Ag-Home Ec. 
Club 4. 

SCHELL, RUTH— Class Treasurer 1, YWCA 
1,2,3,4; Berea Players 1,2,3,4, Council 
1 ,2,3,4, Group Chm. 1 , Treasurer 2,3,4; 
Alpha Psi Omega 2,3,4, Treasurer 3, Pres. 
4; Tau Delta Tau 2,3,4, Sec.-Treas. 3, 
Vice-Pres. 4, Wallpaper Staff 2; Chimes 
Staff 3,4, Literary Ed. 4; PAF 1; WHO'S 
WHO IN AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES AND 
COLLEGES. 

SLOANE, PAULINE— YWCA 1,2,3; Berea Play- 
ers 1,2,3; Outing Club 2; CYS 2; Home Ec 
Club 3,4, Pres. 4; Ag-Home Ec Club 4; 
Chimes Staff 4. 

SLUSHER, RUTH— UD Student Council 4; Har- 
monia 4; UD Senate, Sec. 3; YWCA 1,2, 
3,4; Berea Players 1,2,3; Chimes Staff 4. 

SPRINKLE, NINA— Berea Players 1,2,3,4. 

SMITH, OLGA - - Education Club 3,4; Berea 
Players 3; YWCA 1. 

SMITH, OPALEE— WAA 1,2,3; Home Ec Club 
3,4; Ag-Home Ec Club 4; YWCA 1,2,3,4; 
Berea Players 4. 

SPARKS, MADGE— YWCA 1 ,2; WAA 4, Sec. 4; 
Berea Players 1 ,4; Home Ec Club 4, Sec. 4; 
Ag-Home Ec Club 4. 

STANLEY, MARY— Transfer W. Va. Wesleyan 
College; YWCA 3,4, Cabinet 3,4; Sociology 
Club 4. 

THRELKELD, JANE — Berea Players 1,2,3, 
YWCA 1,2,3,4; Harmonia 3,4; PAF 3,4. 



TREDENNICK, DOROTHY— Inter-Dorm Coun- 
cil 1; PAF 1,2,3,4, Pres. 3,4; Union Church 
Choir 1,2,3; Harmonia 1,2; LD Senate 2; 
Twenty Writers 1,2,3,4, Pres. 3,4; Berea 
Players 1; UD Student Council 3,4; UD 
Women's Association, Pres. 4; Ky. Repre- 
sentative, Conference of Southern Colleges 
and Universities 3,4; WHO'S WHO IN 
AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES AND COL- 
LEGES. 

WETZEL, ROSEMARY— Berea Players 1,2; 
YWCA 1; PAF 1,2,3,4; Pan American 
League 3,4, Publicity Chairman 4. 

WHEELER, DOROTHY JEAN— Union Church 
Choir 4; Harmonia 1,2,3,4; Pan American 
Union 3,4, Sec. 3, Pres. 4; YWCA 1,2,3,4; 
PAF 3,4; Berea Players 2,3; Education 
Club 4. 

WILDER, FANNY— Transfer Cumberland Col- 
lege, Ky.; Ag-Home Ec Club 4; Home Ec 
Club 3,4. 

WILLIAMS, EVALEE— Union Church Choir 4; 
Berea Players 1,2; YWCA 1,2,3,4; Pi Alpha 
3,4; Education Club 4; Bird Club 4. 

WILLIAMS, FORREST— YMCA 1,2,3,4; Class 
Pres. 3; Basketball 3,4. 

WILLIAMS, ORMAND C— Transfer Mars Hill 
College, N. C; Ag Club 3,4, Sec. 3, Public- 
ity Mgr. 4; UD Senate 3, UD Student Coun- 
cil 4; YMCA 3,4, Cabinet 3, Pres. 4; BSU 
3,4, Vice-Pres. 4; Prayer Group 3,4; Life 
Service 3,4; WHO'S WHO IN AMERICAN 
UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES. 

WILLIAMS, PATRICIA— BSU 1,2,3,4, Council 
4; Life Service 2,3,4, Pres. 3; PAF 1; 
Prayer Group 1,2,3,4; YWCA 1,2,3,4, Cab- 
inet 3,4; Berea Players 3, Harmonia 1,2,4; 
Home Ec Club 3,4; Country Dancers 1 , 
Outlying church work 1,2,3,4; Danforth 
Chapel Choir 3. 

WILLS, Anna— Harmonia 1,2,3,4; YWCA 2,4, 
Cabinet 4; Pi Alpha 3.4; BSU 1,2,3,4, 
Council 3; French Club 3. 

WING, JAMES M. — Transfer Brevard College, 
North Carolina; Berea Players 3; Ag-Home 
Ec Club 3,4, Sec 4; Ag Union 3,4, Sec. 4. 

YOUNT, RENA— Transfer Flora McDonald Col- 
lege, North Carolina; Home Ec Club 3,4; 
YWCA 3,4; Ag-Home Ec Club 4, Pres. 4. 



BIOGRAPHIES, 12th GRADE 



BAIRD, GEORGIA — Girl Reserves, Vice-Pres. 2. 

BAKER, VIOLET— Glee Club 1; Berea Players 
2,3. 

BECK, JOSEPHINE— House Pres. 2, Girl Re- 
serves 2. 

BLESSING, WILLIAM— Wallpaper 4, Band 4, 
YMCA 4. 

BOWLING, MARY— Girl Reserves 2, Pres. 1 ; 
YWCA 3,4; Berea Players 4. 

BRADBURY, RAYMOND A. — Berea Players 3, 
4; Vice Pres. 4; House Council Represent- 
ative 3; Basketball 4; YMCA 4 

BURTON, GENE— Hi-Y 1,2, Sec. 2; Berea Play 
ers 2,3,4, YMCA 3,4; Hi-Y Advisor 4, 
Berea Folk Dancers 2,3,4. 

CAIN, LEILA— Berea Players 4, WAA 4. 
CAMPBELL, MARY ELIZABETH- 
CHAMBERS, GRACE — Girl Reserve 2; Basket- 
ball 2; Glee Club 2. 

CLARKSON, PAUL — YMCA 1; Berea Players 2; 
Folk Dancing I 

COAPMAN, JOHN — Union Church Choir 4, 
Men's Glee Club 4; LD Senate 4, Cosmo- 
politan Club 3,4, YMCA 4 

COLLINS, SCOTT— Berea Players 3,4; YMCA 
4. 

CRAIN, SARA BETH— Girl Reserves 1,2; Berea 
Players 4; Vanguards 4. 

CROW, MIRIAM— Berea Players 4; Basketball 
4. 

DANIELS, MARTHA— Harmonia 4, Vanguard 
Council 4; Union Church Choir 4. 

DANIELS, PHYLLIS— Orchestra 4, Harmonia 
4; YWCA 4, Union Church Choir 4; PAF 
4. 

DAUSE, HAZEL— Berea Players 4; Basketball 
1,2,3,4. 



DAWSON, PATRICIA - - Union Church Choir 
2,3,4; Studio Ensemble 3,4, Harmoni'. 
Studio Ensemble 3,4, Harmonia 3,4, : 
Players 4. 

DIXON, VIRGINIA— 

DORTON, DOROTHY — Harmonio 3,4 

DOUGLASS, DAVID— Hi Y 2, YMCA 3,4, Har- 
monia 3,4; Glee Club 2 

EICKER, WILLIAM — Vanguards 4; Band 4, 
Council Member 4, Union Church Choir 4; 
Orchestra 4, Men's Glee Club 4; Harmonia 
4, Librarian 4. 

FEARNOW, LEONA IMOGENE— Berea Players 
3, Bird Club 2. 

FELTNER, BERNICE— 

FILMORE, GEORGE— Hi Y 1 ,2 Treas. 1,2; Berea 
Players 1,2,3,4; Thespians 3,4, Sec. 3,4; 
Bird Club 3,4; YMCA 2,3,4, Secretary 4. 

FISH, EARLE— Berea Players 4, LD Senate 4; 
Basketball 1,2,3,4, YMCA 3,4. 

GATEWOOD, MAX— YMCA 2,3,4; Berea Play- 
ers 3; Basketball 2,3; Harmonia 3; Glee 
Club 2; Band 2. 

HAYES, JEAN — Studio Ensemble 3,4; Harmonia 
4. 

HICKS, EDNA— Girl Reserve 2; Sec. and Treas. 

HORTON, SAMUEL— Berea Players 3; Basket- 
ball 3; YMCA 3,4. 

HUDDLESTON, JANE ELLEN— Glee Club 2. 

HUDLOW, GLORIA— Girl Reserves 1,2; Har- 
monia 4. 

HUFF, JEANETTE— Glee Club 1,2; Girl Re- 
serves 1,2; WAA 3,4; Berea Plovers 4. 

HURST, MARY— YWCA 3 4 

ISON, FLORENE— YWCA 4. 

JACKSON THELMA JEAN— Girl Reserves 1.2. 



JUSTICE, PATRICIA RUTH— Basketball 1,2,3, 
4; Girl Reserves 1 ; Harmonia 3,4; LD Sen- 
ate 3,4. 

MARTIN, GALEN— YMCA 4. 

MINIARD, CLARICE— Berea Players 4; Van- 
guards 4; Girl Reserves 1,2. 

MORGAN, KATHRYN— 

MORGAN, WILLIAM— Basketball 2,3,4; Treas. 
4; YMCA 4. 

MUNCY, PATRICIA — Union Church Choir 2,3, 
4. 

NOLL, LEONORE — Berea Players 2,3,4, Group 
Chairman 4; Thespians 3,4; Vice-Pres. 3,4; 
Union Church Choir 2,3,4; LD Senate 4; 
Chimes Staff 4. 

PARKER, RICHARD— Berea Players 3,4, Group 
Chairman 4; Union Church C.E. 3,4, Treas. 
4; YMCA 3,4. 

PEARL, BETTY JO — Chairman of Social Com- 
mittee 3,4; Union Church Choir 3,4. 



PENNINGTON, JOYCE 
Thespians 4. 



Berea Players 4, 



RICHIE, GEORGIA— YWCA 3,4; Berea Players 
3,4; Vanguards 4; Harmonia 2. 

ROSS, LUCILLE — Berea Players 4; Girl Reserves 
1,2. 



SANDERS, MINNIE LEA— 

SAYLOR, AILEEN— House Council 1,3; Pres. 4; 
YWCA 4. 

SCOTT, MARY KATHLEEN— Glee Club 1,2; 
Berea Players 4. 

SCHELL, LOGAN— YMCA 3,4; Berea Players 2; 
Folk Dancing 2. 

SHOLAR, LOLA — Berea Players 4; Vanguards 
Council 4; YWCA 4. 

SKAGGS, MYRL— YWCA 3. 

SPILLMAN, THOMAS— Berea Players 1 ; Basket- 
ball 2,3,4; YMCA 4; Pres. 3.4. 

SPURLOCK, BESSIE— Folk Dancers 2; Girl Re- 
serves 1; Basketball 1,2,3. 

STEVENS, HOWARD— YMCA 3,4. 

TAYLOR, BEVERLY— Union Church Choir 2,3,4, 
Berea Players 2,3,4; Thespians 4, Pres. 3,4. 

WARINNER, JOANNE— Union Church Choir 
3; Berea Players 3,4; Harmonia 4; Band 4; 
Chairman Social Comm.3. 

WEGENER, BETTY— Berea Players 3; Wallpaper 
Staff 4. 

WHITE, CLARA— Basketball 3. 

YOUNG, LILLIAN— Harmonia 3. 

YOWELL, LENA— Berea Players 4; Glee Club 1, 
Girl Reserves 1 . 



the backbone of 



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OUR ADVERTISERS 




THE CHIMES 

of 1946 has been produced by skilled craftsmen of the 

Berea College Press 

with the help of many student employees. 
Ever since 1930 the CHIMES has been produced annually by this same 

Printing House 



HERE'S TO YOUR HEALTH' 

Sanitary Septic Tanks Glazed Well Casing 

The Twin Foes of Disease 
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OF 
BEREA COLLEGE 

Berea College offers much of interest both in its 
scenic beauties and in its education program. This 
charming inn is located at the gateway to Ken- 
tucky's romantic mountains. Now is your vacation 
time — relax and enjoy the privileges of a college 
community. 



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COMPANY 

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TO BEREA ... 

Our sincere appreciation for the many years 
)f pleasant associations we have enjoyed as sup- 
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3akery Products 

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HAND WEAVING 




1 15 Franklin St. 



Jfrtsli 2jtitcn 
IT'S LOVELY — IT LASTS 

LOOMS AND ACCESSORIES 

in stock now 
Samples and Prices on Request 

HUGHES FAWCETT, Inc. 

New York 1 3 
N.Y. 



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One of the oldest log schoolhouses still in use, it is the scene of the 
"Renfro Valley Gatherin'/' heard every Sunday morning at 8:15 over 
WHAS, Louisville, Kentucky, and the CBS Southern Network. This 
program, sponsored by Ballard and Ballard, aims at the expansion 
and perpetuation of a community meeting of many years standing in 
the Renfro Valley Settlement — The Renfro Valley Gatherin'. 



Food Products of Quality 



Pickles, Preserves, Jams, Jellies 



and Fruit Butters 



LUTZ & SCHRAMM INC. 



Pittsburg, Pa 



Compliments 

OWEN McKEE 
THE LADIES' STORE 

Richmond, Kentucky 



When in Berea . 
eat at the 

BLUE GRASS 



COMPLIMENTS of 



CRANE CO. 



Compliments of 

DORIS PIATT 

SHOP 



FINE PAPER SPECIALTIES 

BETTY BRITE 

White Doilies, Tinted Doilies Place Mats Shelf 

Papers, Baking Cups 

AMERICAN 

Drinking Cups, Porcell Cups, Napkins Ramekins 

Tray Covers, Candv Box Findings 

AMERICAN LACE PAPER CO. 

Milwaukee 12, Wis 



CONGRATULATIONS! 

CLASS '46 
THE COLLEGE STORE 



REMEMBER THE "HANGOUT" 



When You Return 



THE STUDENT HANGOUT 



"SISTRUNK" 

THE BIG HOUSE 

W. T. SISTRUNK & CO. 

WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS 

(Largest in Central Kentucky) 

Fruits — Vegetables — Groceries - - Notions - - Confections 

Hotel -- Restaurant — Fountain Supplies 

LEXINGTON, 31, KENTUCKY 



Compliments of 
PAN CONFECTIONS 



Compliments 

of 

A Friend 



KINGSKRAFT COVERS 

Used On The 1946 CHIMES 
Manufactured by the 

KINGSPORT PRESS, INC. 

Kingsport, Tennessee 



for that quiet snack between classes . . . meet 
me at . . . 

COTTON'S PLACE 

Short Street 



Sandwiches 



Ice Cream 



Cold Drinks 



* HOME COOKING- 




LITTLE MAMA'S 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

A FRIEND 



Compliments of 

THE BEREA BANK 

AND TRUST CO. 



DEPARTMENT (H OF HEALTH 




Food Handling fl K Establishment 



ISSUED FOR i»*g w ^. 

Cm J* Card ^^I^^H^K 

■MB ■ 



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AT PFftEA, JHMTUCtt 

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Tb» IMMV m»7 b* (•»eJ»d b. ihr Hfllh flficr- w nulm: of lb* «l«bh»K™rnl «id mu- br *m»nwd *> 
tii* Hsakh Oldirr lli.i MMH> i» nil U .mJerablr »nd ■■■■Lit t* pMtetJ 

•►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦» *e>**** *»•*••***♦**». *»********♦♦♦ 



'COMPLIMENTS OF A FRIEND" 



< ,>^\, ,v^^ ^^v, ^^ ^^K 



TO A 

SWELL CLASS 

AND A 

GREAT SCHOOL 

PAPER PACKAGE COMPANY 

INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA 



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SLEEPY-HEAD HOUSE 

FOR THE FINEST HOME FURNISHINGS 

"The South's Most Complete Factory-To-You Furniture Store" 

Retail Division of Southern Bedding Co., Incorporated 



LEXINGTON, KY. 
We Work that You May Sleep" 




Be Better Fitted 

in 

BAYNHAMS 

Shoes of Distinction 

Lexington, Ky. Louisville, Ky. 

Nashville, Tenn. 



John F. Dean Edward L. Roberts 

JOHN F. DEAN AGENCY 

Insurance 

Berea Bank & Trust Co. Bldg. 

Phone 35 Berea, Kentucky 



BLACK BROS. BUS LINES 



"Call us for Special Trips" 



Phone 210 



or 



Nearest Bus Station 



Richmond, Kentucky 



Compliments of 



A Friend 



Compliments of 
BEREA DRY CLEANERS 

E. L EDWARDS, Prop. 

Cleaning — Pressing — Tailoring 

Special Attention to Student 

Work 

Short St. Phone 328 



Compliments of the 
MIAMI MARGARINE 

COMPANY 



CODELL CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, Inc. 



GENERAL CONTRACTORS 



Winchester, Kentucky 

HIGHWAYS OUT OF MOUNTAINS 




Modern 
Beauty Salon 



TYPEWRITERS 



Short Streel 



Compliments of 



BEREA NATIONAL BANK 



Compliments 
of 

ASHLAND HOME TELEPHONE COMPANY 
Inc. 

Serving Forty Kentucky Communities 



UN DERWOOD 



ADDING MACHINES 



ACCOUNTING MACHINES 



AND SUPPLIES 



SPEED THE WORLD'S BUSINESS 

UNDERWOOD CORPORATION 



ONE PARK AVENUE NEW YORK, 16, N. Y. 



LACQUER SPECIALTIES, INC., 



Newark 5, New Jersey 



Broom Handle Lacquers of Proven Quality 



Compliments of 



G. & M. RESTAURANT 



"A Good Place to Eat" 



Chestnut 




Assure You 



VARIETY 



VITALITY 



VITAMINS 



Fred Richardson, Mgr 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

A FRIEND 



VALUE 



Mwa\s ' 



LOOK FOR THE LION HEAD 



FOR FINER QUALITY FOODS 



A. F. SCRUGGS 



INSURANCE AGENCY 



Short Street 



Berea, Ky. 



THE NEW 
FISHERIES COMPANY 

FISH 

SEA FOODS 

OYSTERS 

324 328 

W. Sixth Street 
Cincinnati, Ohio 



Compliments of 



BOONE TAVERN 



BARBER SHOP 




<^JV\oiUlta.Ul ^VJ£.£.ti. 



-■* *•• ■ ■ - I llll 



■an 




For the Smartest Junior Dresses 
Wear a Minx Modes Junior 

Okayed by the Jr. Board of Review composed 
of alert, alive, College and Career Girls 

Minx Modes Exclusively in Lexington at Martins 

MARTIN'S 
Blue Grass Fashions 

Lexington's Fastest Growing 
Specialty Store 



Hoonz JauExn (fyiji* ^noli 



Products of Student Industries 



Located on the Corner of Main Street 



Opposite Union Church 



Under Berea College Management — Berea, Kentucky 



BEREA THEATRE 



Where you can always see 



a good show 



BRYAN-HUNT CO. 



Incorporated 



Lexington, Kentucky 



STATE BANK AND 



TRUST CO. 



Richmond, Kentucky 



K-CAB 

24 hour Service 
Tel. 353 



THE E. T. SLIDER COMPANY 

River Road at Campbell JAckson 2381 

LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY 

Producers and Shippers of Washed and Screened 
SAND and GRAVEL from the OHIO RIVER 

Our Motto: "Quality and Prompt Service" 



Compliments of 



UNITED STATES PIPE AND FOUNDRY COMPANY 



BIRMINGHAM, ALA 



'Meet you at T. P's" 



Compliments of 

IDEAL CAFE 

"Ideal Place to Eat' 

Tel 141 



ELLIOTT COMPANY 

Manufacturers of power plant equipment, including steam and gas turbine- 
generators, motors and generators, deaerators and feedwater heaters, con- 
densers, steam jet ejectors, desuperheaters, strainers, steam and oil 
separators, cleaners, superchargers for Diesel engines. 

Plants in 

JEANNETTE, PA., RIDGEWAY, PA. AND SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 



GREETINGS, CLASS OF '46 

We are glad for our young people everywhere that our nation has been blessed 
with victory and peace 

We congratulate you on your achievements thus far in life which have made 
it possible for you to graduate from a splendid institution. You are better 
fitted to assume the obligations and responsibilities which must be discharged 
to preserve and perpetuate your heritage for which this entire people waged 
such a gallant fight. 

Again - - - Greetings, and our sincere best wishes. 

DIXIE WAX PAPER COMPANY 



MEMPHIS 



DALLAS 



Compliments of 



YOUNG AND EPLEE 



LOUISVILLE BEDDING COMPANY 

Louisville 2, Kentucky 
Manufacturers of finer bedding for over 50 years 

OLD KENTUCKY QUILTS 

SPRING-AIR MATTRESSES 

COMFORTS— QUI LTED PADDING — PILLOWS 



Compliments of 



Central Service Station 



Compliments of 



Elkins Drug Store 






MMt 



.|OH\ M IIW AIC/ 



Fine Footwear 



754 & 756 McMillian St. 



Cincinnati, Ohio 




Doughnut Corporation 



of America 



393 Seventh Avenue. 



New Yorkl.N. V 



JjEiza CoLUcjz ^tuaEnt {Jndusbil&i 




The finest things are made by hand 



i *i*.t^ tm» «■*>•>*— ■ »»«—— IMMMM 





Handicraft gifts are never forgotten 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



STANDARD TEXTILE COMPANY 



Cincinnati, Ohio 



Compliments 
of 
RIVERS' SHOE SHOP 
Short St. Phone 312 



Compliments of 
ROMINGER FUNERAL HOME 

Ambulance Service 
Tel. 125 & 48 Berea, KentuckJ 



BROCK-MCVEY CO. 
Incorporated 

Distributors of 
Plumbing, Heating and Tinners' Supplies 

Vine and Southeastern Streets 
Lexington, Ky. 



Compliments of 



Berea 5c to $1.00 Store 



Compliments 

of 

a 

Friend 



- 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



COLONIAL HOTEL 



Telephone 84 



Berea, Kentucky 



PICTURE POST CARDS 
SOUVENIR FOLDERS 

ARTVUE POST CARD CO. 

225 Fifth Avenue 
New York 10, N.Y. 



Authorized Distributor 

A.B. DICK MIMEOGRAPH DUPLICATORS 

AND 

SUPPLIES 

THE LANG COMPANY 

21 1 West Market Street Louisville 2, Kentucky 



Best Wishes for the Class of 1946 



DAVIDSON BROTHERS AND CO. 



Berea, Kentucky 



NU-WAY CLEANERS 



Quality cleaning and prompt service is our specialty 



PHONE 61 



BEREA, KENTUCKY 



Compliments of 




PORTER MOORE DRUG COMPANY 

WHERE THE NATION SHOPS AND SAVES 
Over 1600 Stores 

J. C. PENNEY COMPANY 



Richmond, Kentucky 



iw3 BIIOK. 

WHOLESALE FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

IRVINE STREET 

RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 



FOR PORTRAITS 



OF HIGHEST QUALITY 

THE McGAUGHEY STUDIO 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 



RU BEE, Owner 



Whether 

It's Badminton or Tennis 

JUNEMAN'S 
Is the Gut of Champions 



Compliments 

of 

ZARING'S MILL 

Use Zaring's Patent Flour 

Richmond Kentucky 



EMMART'S 
MAGNOLIA 

BRAND 
BOLOGNA 

Made of beef and pork with just enough 
spices to assure a distincttive flavor. 

Emmart Packing Company 

Incorporated 



CAROLYN 



BERKLEY 

Fashions 

for 

Juniors, Misses, & Women 

B. B. SMITH & CO., Inc 
LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY 



GUILDCRAFT 



Compliments of 
BEREA MOTOR CO. 

Berea, Kentucky 



T 



A Means of Buying through a 
Single Source 



Inc. 



Theatre Production Service 

All Supplies and Equipment for the Theatre 

1430 Broadway Write for Catalogue 

New York City 



"Beautiful Shoes" 
for Women 

BROWN'S BOOTERIE 

138 W Mom St 

Lexington, Kentucky 

Also Louisville, Ky., Knoxville, Tenn 

and Chattanooga, Tenn 



FERNCLIFF FEED & GRAIN CO. 

Incorporated 
Louisville, Ky 

Manufacturers of 
"Cracker Jack" and "P.D.Q." 

Molasses Feeds 



Our Merchandise 

Is Sold At 
The College Store 



SIMON ADES SONS CO. 



Louisville, Kentucky 



Compliments of 

FOLEY MOTOR COMPANY 

"Ford Sales and Service" 

Berea, Kentucky Tel. 308 



E. E. GABBARD 

"Eat Here or We 
Both Starve" 



Chestnut 



Open 24 Hours 



Compliments of 



LEHMAN BROS. 

"KNOWN FOR BETTER VALUES" 
Richmond, Kentucky 



Compliments of 



UNITED DEPARTMENT STORE 



Richmond, Kentucky 



Compliments of 



H. AND H. FURNITURE STORE 



TEL. 292 



Compliments of 



a 
Friend 



PADAWER & CO 

Filling Materials 

24 Stone Street 

New York 4, N. Y. 



Bed Pans 
Wheel Chairs 
Infra-Red Heatlamps 



Trusses 



SICK ROOM SUPPLIES 



Urinals 

Hospital Beds 

Ultra Violet Sun Lamps 



Surgical Garments 
Crutches 



Canes 



DAY OR NIGHT SERVICE 

L. T. FLAKE & SON 

HOSPITAL AND SURGICAL SUPPLIES 



Phone 

Day 4446 

Night — Shelby 21 IS 



53 West Short Street 
Lexington, Kentuck\ 



«• 



m 



SSSSWS 







FLOWERS 



and 



PLANTS 



BOUQUETS 



and 



CORSAGES 



are always fresh and beautiful when ordered from 



Phone 838 



RICHMOND GREENHOUSES 
Johnny P. Reichsparr 



Richmond, Kentucky 



Compliments of a Friend 



STANIFER'S STUDIO 



'Portraits of Distinction' 



Phone 39 



Richmond, Kentucky 



Compliments of 



HYMER MOTOR COMPANY 



Berea, Kentucky 



Tel. 331 



WHEELERS 



Kentucky's 

Finest 

Furniture 

Store 



221-23 E. Main 
Lexington 



fcfW? » fill 




// 



PAT McCRAY'S PLACE 



NEW AND MODERN 



WELCOMES YOU 
The Same Old Hospitality" 



^ rirfrin rw / 




M JAHN % OLLIER AGAIN' 



The slogan that's backed by genuine goodness in 
quality ana service, the result of 43 years successful 
experience in the yearbook field. 

We find real satisfaction in pleasing you, the year- 
book publisher, as well as your photographer and 
your printer. 



JAHN g OLLIER ENGRAVING CO. 

Makers of Fine Printing Plates for Black or Color 

Commercial Artists - Photographers 
817 W.WASHINGTON BLVD., CHICAGO 7. ILL. 






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